Stay meaning

stā
To meet a bet in poker without raising it.
verb
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To remain during.

Stayed the week with my parents; stayed the duration of the game.

verb
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The definition of a stay is a visit somewhere.

An example of stay is a week long trip to the Niagara Falls area.

noun
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Stay is defined as to spend time in a place or to continue to be in the same condition.

An example of stay is for a child to visit his grandparents for a week.

An example of stay is to remain working with a company for a number of years.

verb
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To stop moving or stop doing something.
verb
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To wait for; await.
verb
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A brief period of residence or visiting.
noun
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To brace, support, or prop up.

The tower is stayed with cables.

verb
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A support or brace.
noun
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A strip of bone, plastic, or metal, used to stiffen a garment or part, such as a corset or shirt collar.
noun
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A corset.
noun
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A heavy rope or cable, usually of wire, used as a brace or support for a mast or spar.
noun
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A rope used to steady, guide, or brace.
noun
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To put (a ship) on the opposite tack or to come about.
verb
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A heavy rope or cable, usually of wire, used as a brace or support, as for a mast of a ship; guy.
noun
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To brace or support with a stay or stays.
verb
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Anything used as a support, or prop.
noun
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A strip of stiffening material used in a corset, the collar of a shirt, etc.
noun
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A corset stiffened as with whalebone.
noun
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To support, or prop up.
verb
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To strengthen, comfort, or sustain in mind or spirit.
verb
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To cause (something) to rest on, upon, or in for support.
verb
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To continue in the place or condition specified; remain; keep.

To stay at home, to stay healthy.

verb
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To live, dwell, or reside, esp. temporarily (for the time specified)
verb
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To stand still; stop; halt.
verb
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To pause; tarry; wait; delay.
verb
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To continue or endure; last.

To stay with a project.

verb
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To keep up (with another contestant in a race, etc.)
verb
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To cease doing something.
verb
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To make a stand.
verb
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To remain in a hand by equaling the preceding bet.
verb
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To stop, halt, or check.
verb
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To hinder, impede, restrain, or detain.
verb
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To postpone or delay (legal action or proceedings)
verb
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To quell or allay (strife, etc.)
verb
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To satisfy or appease for a time the pangs or cravings of (thirst, appetite, etc.)
verb
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To await.
verb
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A postponement or delay in legal action or proceedings.

A stay of execution.

noun
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Ability to continue or endure.
noun
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A judicial order forbidding or holding in abeyance some action until some particular event occurs, or until the court lifts the stay. A single justice of the United States Supreme Court has the power to stay an injunction’s being enforced pending an appeal to the full Court. See also injunction and restraining order.
noun
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A procedure to prevent the carrying out of a judgment for a specified period of time; in the case of death penalty, an order from a higher court or executive branch of a state to halt the execution, usually pending further appeals.
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(nautical) A strong rope supporting a mast, and leading from the head of one mast down to some other, or other part of the vessel.
noun
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A guy, rope, or wire supporting or stabilizing a platform, such as a bridge, a pole, such as a tentpole, the mast of a derrick, or other structural element.

The engineer insisted on using stays for the scaffolding.

noun
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(chain-cable) The transverse piece in a link.
noun
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(nautical) To incline forward, aft, or to one side by means of stays.

Stay a mast.

verb
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(nautical) To tack; put on the other tack.

To stay ship.

verb
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(intransitive, nautical) To change; tack; go about; be in stays, as a ship.
verb
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To prop; support; sustain; hold up; steady.
verb
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To stop; detain; keep back; delay; hinder.
verb
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To restrain; withhold; check; stop.
verb
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To put off; defer; postpone; delay; keep back.

The governor stayed the execution until the appeal could be heard.

verb
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To hold the attention of.
verb
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To bear up under; to endure; to hold out against; to resist.
verb
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To wait for; await.
verb
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(intransitive) To rest; depend; rely.
verb
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(intransitive) To stop; come to a stand or standstill.
verb
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(intransitive) To come to an end; cease.

That day the storm stayed.

verb
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(intransitive) To dwell; linger; tarry; wait.
verb
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(intransitive) To make a stand; stand.
verb
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(intransitive) To hold out, as in a race or contest; last or persevere to the end.

That horse stays well.

verb
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(intransitive) To remain in a particular place, especially for an indefinite time; sojourn; abide.

We stayed in Hawaii for a week. I can only stay for an hour.

verb
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(intransitive) To wait; rest in patience or expectation.
verb
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(intransitive, used with on or upon) To wait as an attendant; give ceremonious or submissive attendance.
verb
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(intransitive) To continue to have a particular quality.

Wear gloves so your hands stay warm.

verb
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To support from sinking; to sustain with strength; to satisfy in part or for the time.
verb
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To cause to cease; to put an end to.
verb
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To fasten or secure with stays.

To stay a flat sheet in a steam boiler.

verb
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noun
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(archaic) A fastening for a garment; a hook; a clasp; anything to hang another thing on.
noun
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That which holds or restrains; obstacle; check; hindrance; restraint.
noun
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A stop; a halt; a break or cessation of action, motion, or progress.
noun
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A postponement, especially of an execution or other punishment.

The governor granted a stay of execution.

noun
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(archaic) A standstill; a state of rest; entire cessation of motion or progress.

Stand at a stay.

noun
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A fixed state; fixedness; stability; permanence.
noun
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Continuance or a period of time spent in a place; abode for an indefinite time; sojourn.

I hope you enjoyed your stay in Hawaii.

noun
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(nautical) A station or fixed anchorage for vessels.
noun
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Restraint of passion; prudence; moderation; caution; steadiness; sobriety.
noun
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A piece of stiff material, such as plastic or whalebone, used to stiffen a piece of clothing.

Where are the stays for my collar?

noun
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Restraint of passion; moderation; caution; steadiness; sobriety.
noun
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(UK dialectal) Steep; ascending.
adjective
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(UK dialectal) (of a roof) Steeply pitched.
adjective
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(UK dialectal) Difficult to negotiate; not easy to access; sheer.
adjective
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adjective
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(UK dialectal) Steeply.
adverb
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To satisfy or appease temporarily.

Stayed his anger.

verb
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stay put
  • To remain in a fixed or established position.
idiom
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stay the course
  • To hold out or persevere to the end of a race or challenge.
idiom
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stay with (one)
  • To remain in one's memory; not be forgotten:.
    That kind of compliment stays with you for years.
idiom
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in stays
idiom
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stay put
  • To remain in place or unchanged.
idiom
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stay the course
  • To continue in some effort or course of action to its end, in spite of difficulties or obstacles; persevere.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of stay

  • Middle English steien from Old French ester, esteir from Latin stāre stā- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English staien from Old French estaiier from estaie a support of Germanic origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English stæg

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English steyen, staien, from Old French estayer, estaier (“to fix, prop up, support, stay"), from estaye, estaie (“a prop, stay"), from Middle Dutch staeye (“a prop, stay"), a contracted form of staede, stade ("a prop, stay, help, aid"; compare Middle Dutch staeyen, staeden (“to make firm, stay, support, hold still, stabilise")), from Old Dutch *stad (“a site, place, location, standing"), from Proto-Germanic *stadiz (“a standing, place"), from Proto-Indo-European *stā- (“to stand"). Influenced by Old English stæġ ("a stay, rope"; see above). Cognate with Old English stede, stæde (“a place, spot, locality, fixed position, station, site, standing, status, position of a moving body, stopping, standing still, stability, fixity, firmness, steadfastness"), Swedish stödja (“to prop, support, brace, hold up, bolster"), Icelandic stöðug (“continuous, stable"). More at stead, steady.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English *staye, from Old French estaye, estaie (“a prop, a stay"), from Middle Dutch staeye (“a prop, stay"), a contracted form of staede, stade ("a prop, stay, help, aid"; compare Middle Dutch staeyen, staeden (“to make firm, stay, support, hold still, stabilise")), from Old Dutch *stad (“a site, place, location, standing"), from Proto-Germanic *stadiz (“a standing, place"), from Proto-Indo-European *stā- (“to stand"). See above.

    From Wiktionary

  • An alternative etymology derives Old French estaye, estaie, from Old Frankish *staka (“stake, post"), from Proto-Germanic *stakô (“stake, bar, stick, pole"), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)teg- (“rod, pole, stick"), making it cognate with Old English staca (“pin, stake"), Old English stician (“to stick, be placed, lie, remain fixed"). Cognate with Albanian shtagë (“a long stick, a pole"). More at stake, stick.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English *stay, from Old English stæġ (“stay, a rope supporting a mast"), from Proto-Germanic *stagÄ… (“stay, rope"), from Proto-Indo-European *stek-, *stāk- (“stand, pole"), from Proto-Indo-European *stā- (“to stand"). Cognate with Dutch stag (“stay"), German Stag (“stay"), Swedish stag (“stay"), Icelandic stag (“stay").

    From Wiktionary

  • Sense of "remain, continue" may be due to later influence from Old French ester, esteir (“to stand, be, continue, remain"), from Latin stāre (“stand"), from the same Proto-Indo-European root above; however, derivation from this root is untenable based on linguistic and historical grounds.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English *steȝe, from Old English *stǣġe, an apocopated variant of Old English stǣġel (“steep, abrupt"), from Proto-Germanic *staigilaz (“climbing, ascending, sloping, steep"), see sty.

    From Wiktionary