Stick meaning

stĭk
(informal) A piece of furniture.
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A number of bombs, parachutists, etc. dropped from the air in such a way as to fall in a line across a target area.
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(nautical) A mast or a part of a mast.
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To stick is to poke someone with something sharp or to put something somewhere without giving much thought to it.

An example of stick is when you prick someone with a pin.

An example of stick is when you carelessly put a book on a shelf.

verb
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The definition of a stick is a piece of a branch that has fallen from a tree or a piece of wood that has been fashioned into something such as a cane, a holder for a popsicle or a tool used in sporting games.

An example of a stick is a fallen branch.

An example of a stick is a cane.

An example of a stick is a popsicle holder.

An example of a stick is the sporting equipment used to hit a hockey puck.

noun
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A long slender piece of wood, especially:
  • A branch or stem that has fallen or been cut from a tree or shrub.
  • A piece of wood, such as a tree branch, that is used for fuel, cut for lumber, or shaped for a specific purpose.
  • A wand, staff, baton, or rod.
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(sports) A long thin implement with a blade or net on the end used to propel and control a puck or ball in hockey or lacrosse.
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A walking stick; a cane.
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Something that is long and thin.

A stick of dynamite; a stick of gum.

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(slang) A marijuana cigarette.
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A timber tree.
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A poke, thrust, or stab with a stick or similar object.

A stick in the ribs.

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A threatened penalty.

Using both a carrot and a stick to keep allies in line.

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The condition or power of adhering.

A glue with plenty of stick.

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(informal) A person regarded as stiff, boring, or spiritless.
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(obsolete) A difficulty or obstacle; a delay.
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(sports) To execute (a landing or dismount) in gymnastics so that the feet do not move after they hit the ground.
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To detain or delay.

We were stuck at the airport overnight.

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(informal) To confuse, baffle, or puzzle.

I started doing the math problems, but I got stuck.

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To prop (a plant) with sticks or brush on which to grow.
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(printing) To set (type) in a composing stick.
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To cover or smear with something sticky.
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(informal) To put blame or responsibility on; burden.

Stuck me with the bill.

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(slang) To defraud or cheat.

The dealer stuck me with shoddy merchandise.

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To be or become fixed or embedded in place by having the point thrust in.

The spear stuck in the shield.

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To become or remain attached or in close association; cling.

Stick together in a crowd.

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To scruple or hesitate.

She sticks at nothing—no matter how difficult.

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To become fixed, blocked, checked, or obstructed.

The drawer stuck and would not open.

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To project or protrude.

Hair sticking out on his head.

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(sports) To throw a jab in boxing.
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A long, usually slender piece of wood.
  • A twig or small branch broken off or cut off, esp. a dead and dry one.
  • A tree branch of any size, used for fuel, etc.
  • A long, slender, and usually tapering piece of wood shaped for a specific purpose, as a wand, staff, club, baton, cane, rod, etc.
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A stalk, as of celery.
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Something that comes in narrow or oblong pieces.

A stick of chewing gum, of butter, of dynamite, etc.

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A separate item; article.

Every stick of furniture.

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An implement used for striking a ball, puck, etc.

A hockey stick.

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Something made of sticks, as a racing hurdle.
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A sticking, as with a pointed weapon; stab.
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Anything, as a threat, used in compelling another.
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(archaic) A stoppage, delay, or obstacle.
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(informal) A dull, stupid, or spiritless person.
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(slang) A marijuana cigarette.
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(now rare, naut.) A mast or a part of a mast.
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(printing) A composing stick or its contents.
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To pierce or puncture, as with a pointed instrument.
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To kill by piercing; stab.
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To pierce something with (a knife, pin, etc.)
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To thrust or push (in, into, out, etc.)

To stick one's finger into a hole.

verb
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To set with piercing objects.

A cushion stuck with pins.

verb
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To obstruct, entangle, bog down, etc.; also, to detain, delay, etc.

The wheels were stuck; we were stuck in town.

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(informal) To place; put; set.
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(informal) To make sticky by smearing.
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(informal) To puzzle; baffle.

To be stuck by a question.

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(chiefly brit., informal) To endure or tolerate.
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To be or remain fixed or embedded by a pointed end, as a nail.
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To be or remain attached by adhesion; adhere; cleave.
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To remain in close association; be fixed; cling.

Friends stick together; the nickname stuck.

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To keep close.

To stick to a trail.

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To persevere; persist.

To stick at a job.

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To remain firm and resolute; endure.

They stuck through thick and thin.

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To become fixed, blocked, lodged, etc. as by an obstacle.
  • To become embedded and immovable.
    A shoe stuck in the mud.
  • To become unworkable; jam.
    The gears stuck.
  • To become stopped or delayed; come to a standstill.
    A bill stuck in committee.
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To be puzzled.
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To be reluctant; hesitate; scruple.

A person who will stick at nothing.

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To protrude, project, or extend (out, up, through, etc.)
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An elongated piece of wood or similar material, typically put to some use, for example as a wand or baton.
  • A small, thin branch from a tree or bush; a twig; a branch. syn. transl.
    The beaver's dam was made out of sticks. The bird's nest was made out of sticks.
  • A relatively long, thin piece of wood, of any size. transl.
    I found several good sticks in the brush heap. What do you call a boomerang that won't come back? A stick.
  • (US) A timber board, especially a two by four (inches).
    I found enough sticks in dumpsters at construction sites to build my shed.
  • A cane or walking stick (usually wooden, metal or plastic) to aid in walking. syn. transl.
    I don't need my stick to walk, but it's helpful.
  • A cudgel or truncheon (usually of wood, metal or plastic), especially one carried by police or guards.
    As soon as the fight started, the guards came in swinging their sticks.
  • (carpentry) The vertical member of a cope-and-stick joint.
  • (figuratively) A piece (of furniture, especially if wooden). usage syn.
    We were so poor we didn't have one stick of furniture.
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Any roughly cylindrical (rectangular) unit of a substance. transl.
  • (chiefly North America) A small rectangular block, with a length several times its width, which contains by volume one half of a cup of shortening (butter, margarine or lard).
    The recipe calls for half a stick of butter.
  • A standard rectangular (often thin) piece of chewing gum. transl.
    Don't hog all that gum, give me a stick!.
  • (slang) A cigarette (usually a tobacco cigarette, less often a marijuana cigarette). syn.
    Cigarettes are taxed at one dollar per stick.

Sealing wax is available as a cylindrical or rectangular stick.

noun
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Material or objects attached to a stick or the like.
  • A bunch of something wrapped around or attached to a stick.
    (US) My parents bought us each a stick of cotton candy.
  • (archaic) A scroll that is rolled around (mounted on, attached to) a stick.
  • (military) The structure to which a set of bombs in a bomber aircraft are attached and which drops the bombs when it is released. The bombs themselves and, by extension, any load of similar items dropped in quick succession such as paratroopers or containers. syn.
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A tool, control, or instrument shaped somewhat like a stick.
  • (US, colloquial) A manual transmission, a vehicle equipped with a manual transmission, so called because of the stick-like, i.e. twig-like, control (the gear shift) with which the driver of such a vehicle controls its transmission. syn. transl.
    I grew up driving a stick, but many people my age didn't.
  • (aviation) The control column of an aircraft; a joystick. transl. (By convention, a wheel-like control mechanism with a handgrip on opposite sides, similar to the steering wheel ofan automobiles, is also called the "stick".)
  • (aviation, uncountable) Use of the stick to control the aircraft.
  • (computing) A memory stick.
  • (dated, letterpress typography) A composing stick, the tool used by compositors to assemble lines of type.
  • (jazz, slang) The clarinet. (more often called the liquorice stick) syn.
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(sports) A stick-like item:
  • (sports, generically) A long thin implement used to control a ball or puck in sports like hockey, polo, and lacrosse. transl.
    Tripping with the stick is a violation of the rules.
  • (horse racing) The short whip carried by a jockey.
  • (boardsports) A board as used in board sports, such as a surfboard, snowboard, or skateboard.
  • (golf) The pole bearing a small flag that marks the hole. syn.
    His wedge shot bounced off the stick and went in the hole.
  • (US, slang, uncountable) The cue used in billiards, pool, snooker, etc.
    His stroke with that two-piece stick is a good as anybody's in the club.
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(sports, uncountable) Ability; specifically:
  • (golf) The long-range driving ability of a golf club.
  • (baseball) The potential hitting power of a specific bat.
  • (baseball) General hitting ability.
  • (field hockey or ice hockey) The potential accuracy of a hockey stick, implicating also the player using it.
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(slang, dated) A person or group of people. (Perhaps, in some senses, because people are, broadly speaking, tall and thin, like pieces of wood.)
  • A thin or wiry person; particularly a flat-chested woman.
  • (magic) An assistant planted in the audience. syn.
  • (military aviation, from joystick) A fighter pilot.
  • (military, South Africa) A small group of (infantry) soldiers.
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Encouragement or punishment, or (resulting) vigour or other improved behavior.
  • A negative stimulus or a punishment. (This sense derives from the metaphor of using a stick, a long piece of wood, to poke or beat a beast of burden to compel it to move forward. Compare carrot.)
  • (slang, uncountable) Corporal punishment; beatings.
  • (slang) Vigor; spirit; effort, energy, intensity.
    He really gave that digging some stick. = he threw himself into the task of digging.
    She really gave that bully some stick. = she berated him (this sense melts into the previous sense, "punishment").
    Give it some stick!.
  • (slang) Vigorous driving of a car; gas.
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(archaic, rare) A quantity of eels, usually 25. syn.
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(carpentry) To cut a piece of wood to be the stick member of a cope-and-stick joint.
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(auto racing) The traction of tires on the road surface.
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(fishing, uncountable) The amount of fishing line resting on the water surface before a cast; line stick.
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A thrust with a pointed instrument; a stab.
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(ergative) To glue; to attach; to adhere.

Stick the label on the jar.

The tape will not stick if it melts.

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(intransitive) To jam; to stop moving.

The lever sticks if you push it too far up.

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(intransitive) To tolerate, to endure, to stick with.
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(intransitive) To persist.

His old nickname stuck.

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(intransitive) Of snow, to remain frozen on landing.
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(intransitive) To remain loyal; to remain firm.

Just stick to your strategy, and you will win.

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To place, set down (quickly or carelessly).

Stick your bag over there and come with me.

verb
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To press (something with a sharp point) into something else.
  • (now only in dialects) To stab.

The balloon will pop when I stick this pin in it.

To stick a needle into one's finger.

verb
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To fix on a pointed instrument; to impale.

To stick an apple on a fork.

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(archaic) To adorn or deck with things fastened on as by piercing.
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(gymnastics) To perform (a landing) perfectly.

Once again, the world champion sticks the dismount.

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To propagate plants by cuttings.

Stick cuttings from geraniums promptly.

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To hesitate, to be reluctant; to refuse.
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(printing, slang, dated) To compose; to set, or arrange, in a composing stick.

To stick type.

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(joinery) To run or plane (mouldings) in a machine, in contradistinction to working them by hand. Such mouldings are said to be stuck.
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(dated) To bring to a halt; to stymie; to puzzle.

To stick somebody with a hard problem.

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(slang, dated) To impose upon; to compel to pay; sometimes, to cheat.
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(informal) Likely to stick; sticking, sticky.

A non-stick pan. A stick plaster.

A sticker type of glue. The stickest kind of gum.

adjective
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(UK, uncountable) Criticism or ridicule.
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(Ireland) A member of the Official IRA.
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(music) The Chapman Stick, an electric musical instrument devised by Emmett Chapman.
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(informal) be stuck on
  • To be very fond of.
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(slang) stick it to
  • To treat severely or wrongfully.
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(informal) stick (one's) neck out
  • To make oneself vulnerable; take a risk.
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stick to
  • To hold fast to an opinion or a set course of action.
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(informal) stick to (one's) knitting
  • To mind one's own business.
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(informal) stick to (one's) ribs
  • To be substantial or filling. Used of food.
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stick up for
  • To defend or support.
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on the stick
  • alert, efficient, etc.
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stick around
  • to stay near at hand; not go away
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stick by
  • to remain faithful or loyal to
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stick it out
  • to carry on or endure something until it is ended
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(slang) stick it to someone
  • to harshly criticize, punish, or retaliate against someone
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stick to someone's ribs
  • to be nourishing and satisfying
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stick up
  • to commit armed robbery upon
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stick up for
  • to support; uphold; defend
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the sticks
  • the rural districts; hinterland
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Origin of stick

  • Middle English stikke from Old English sticca steig- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English stiken (“to stick, pierce, stab, remain embedded, be fastened"), from Old English stician (“to pierce, stab, remain embedded, be fastened"), from Proto-Germanic *stikōnÄ… (“to pierce, prick, be sharp") (cf. also the related *stikanÄ…, whence West Frisian stekke, Low German steken, Dutch steken, German stechen; compare also Danish stikke, Swedish sticka), from Proto-Indo-European *steig- or *stig- (“to pierce, prick, be sharp").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English stikke (“stick, rod, twig"), from Old English sticca (“rod, twig"), from Proto-Germanic *stikkô, from Proto-Indo-European *steig- or *stig- (“to pierce, prick, be sharp").

    From Wiktionary

  • Cognate to first etymology (same PIE root, different paths through Germanic and Old English), to stitch, and to etiquette, via French étiquette - see there for further discussion.

    From Wiktionary

  • Possibly a metaphorical use of the first etymology ("twig, branch"), possibly derived from the Yiddish schtick.

    From Wiktionary