Fall meaning

fôl
Fall is defined as to drop or come down, often unexpectedly.

An example of fall is to trip and tumble to the ground during a run.

verb
5
2
To drop or come down freely under the influence of gravity.

Leaves fell from the tree.

verb
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2
To apply oneself.

Fell to work immediately.

verb
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2
To assume an expression of consternation or disappointment.

His face fell when he heard the report.

verb
3
1
To pass into a particular state, condition, or situation.

Fell silent; fall in love.

verb
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1
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A becoming lower or less; reduction in value, price, etc.
noun
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A capture; overthrow; ruin.
noun
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The amount of what has fallen.

A six-inch fall of snow.

noun
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The distance that something falls.
noun
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Water falling over a cliff, etc.; cascade.
noun
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To happen; to come to pass; to chance or light (upon).
verb
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Autumn.
noun
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Any of several pendent articles of dress, especially:
  • A veil hung from a woman's hat and down her back.
  • An ornamental cascade of lace or trimming attached to a dress, usually at the collar.
  • A woman's hairpiece with long, free-hanging hair.
noun
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A broad, turned-down ruff or collar worn in the 17th cent.
noun
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A long tress of hair, often synthetic, used by a woman to fill out her coiffure.
noun
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(mech.) The loose end of the rope, cable, etc. used in a block and tackle.
noun
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Of, in, for, or characteristic of the fall season.
adjective
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To be allotted to; to arrive through chance, fate, or inheritance.

And so it falls to me to make this important decision.

The estate fell to his brother; the kingdom fell into the hands of his rivals.

verb
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To descend in character or reputation; to become degraded; to sink into vice, error, or sin.
verb
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To assume a look of shame or disappointment; to become or appear dejected; said of the face.
verb
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To begin with haste, ardour, or vehemence; to rush or hurry.

After arguing, they fell to blows.

verb
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To be dropped or uttered carelessly.

An unguarded expression fell from his lips.

verb
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To come, as by chance.

Fell among a band of thieves.

verb
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To be included within the range or scope of something.

The specimens fall into three categories.

verb
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To be born. Used chiefly of lambs.
verb
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To cut down (a tree); fell.
verb
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The act or an instance of falling.
noun
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A sudden drop from a relatively erect to a less erect position.
noun
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A waterfall.
noun
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A downward movement or slope.
noun
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The end of a cable, rope, or chain that is pulled by the power source in hoisting.
noun
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(botany) One of the outer, drooping segments of a flower, especially an iris.
noun
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Of, having to do with, occurring in, or appropriate to the season of fall.

Fall fashion; fall harvests.

adjective
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Grown during the season of fall.

Fall crops.

adjective
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To come down because detached, pushed, dropped, etc.; move down and land forcibly.

Apples fall from the tree.

verb
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To come down suddenly from a standing or sitting position; tumble; topple; become prostrate.
verb
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To be wounded or killed in battle.
verb
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To come down in ruins; collapse.

The building fell.

verb
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To hang down.

Hair falling about her shoulders.

verb
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To take a downward direction.

Land falling away to the sea.

verb
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To become lower in amount, number, degree, intensity, value, etc.; drop; abate.

Prices fell.

verb
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To lose power; be overthrown.

The government has fallen.

verb
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To lose status, reputation, dignity, etc.
verb
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To yield to temptation; do wrong; sin; specif. in earlier use (esp. of women), to lose chastity.
verb
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To be captured or conquered.
verb
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To take on a look of disappointment or dejection.

His face fell.

verb
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To become lower in pitch or volume.

Her voice fell.

verb
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To take place; occur.

The meeting fell on a Friday.

verb
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To come by lot, distribution, inheritance, etc.

The estate falls to the son.

verb
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To pass into a specified condition; become.

To fall ill, to fall in love.

verb
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To occur at a specified place.

The accent falls on the third syllable.

verb
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To be directed by chance.

His eye fell on a misspelled word.

verb
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To be spoken in an involuntary way.

The news fell from his lips.

verb
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To be born.
verb
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To be divided (into)

To fall into two classes.

verb
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(dial.) To fell (a tree, etc.)
verb
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A dropping; descending; coming down.
noun
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A coming down suddenly from a standing or sitting position.
noun
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A hanging down, or a part hanging down.
noun
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A downward direction or slope.
noun
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A lowering of the voice in pitch or volume.
noun
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A loss of status, reputation, etc.
noun
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A yielding to temptation; wrongdoing; moral lapse.
noun
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That season of the year in which many trees lose their leaves; autumn: in the North Temperate Zone, generally regarded as including the months of September, October, and November.
noun
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(intransitive) To move downwards.
  • To move to a lower position under the effect of gravity.
    Thrown from a cliff, the stone fell 100 feet before hitting the ground.
  • To come down, to drop or descend.
    The rain fell at dawn.
  • To come to the ground deliberately, to prostrate oneself.
    He fell to the floor and begged for mercy.
  • To be brought to the ground.
verb
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(UK, US, dialect, archaic) To fell; to cut down.

To fall a tree.

verb
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(intransitive) To happen, to change negatively.
  • (copulative) To become.
    She has fallen ill.
    The children fell asleep in the back of the car.
    When did you first fall in love?.
  • To occur (on a certain day of the week, date, or similar); said of an instance of a recurring event such as a holiday or date.
    Thanksgiving always falls on a Thursday.
    Last year, Commencement fell on June 3.
  • (intransitive) To collapse; to be overthrown or defeated.
    Rome fell to the Goths in 410 AD.
  • (intransitive, formal, euphemistic) To die, especially in battle or by disease.
    This is a monument to all those who fell in the First World War.
  • (intransitive) To become lower (in quantity, pitch, etc).
    The candidate's poll ratings fell abruptly after the banking scandal.
  • (followed by a determining word or phrase) To become; to be affected by or befallen with a calamity; to change into the state described by words following; to become prostrated literally or figuratively .
    Our senator fell into disrepute because of the banking scandal.
verb
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The act of moving to a lower position under the effect of gravity.
noun
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A reduction in quantity, pitch, etc.
noun
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The fall of Rome.

noun
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(cricket, of a wicket) The action of a batsman being out.
noun
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(curling) A defect in the ice which causes stones thrown into an area to drift in a given direction.
noun
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(wrestling) An instance of a wrestler being pinned to the mat.
noun
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(informal, US) Blame or punishment for a failure or misdeed.

He set up his rival to take the fall.

noun
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The part of the rope of a tackle to which the power is applied in hoisting.
noun
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See falls.
noun
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An old Scots unit of measure equal to six ells.
noun
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(theology) The sudden fall of humanity into a state of sin, as brought about by the transgression of Adam and Eve. [from 14th c.]
pronoun
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The definition of a fall is an often unexpected drop or descent or the season that comes after summer and before winter.

An example of fall is a tumble to the ground.

An example of fall is the month of November.

noun
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1
To become ensnared or entrapped; to be worse off than before.

To fall into error; to fall into difficulties.

verb
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1
fall back on
  • To rely on:
    Fall back on old friends in time of need.
  • To resort to:
    I had to fall back on my savings when I was unemployed.
idiom
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fall between (the) two stools
  • To fail because of an inability to reconcile or choose between two courses of action.
idiom
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fall flat
  • To fail miserably when attempting to achieve a result.
  • To have no effect:
    The jokes fell flat.
idiom
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fall foul
  • To collide. Used of vessels.
  • To clash:
    Fell foul of the law.
idiom
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fall from grace
  • To experience a major reduction in status or prestige.
idiom
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fall into line
  • To adhere to established rules or predetermined courses of action.
idiom
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fall in with
  • To agree with or be in harmony with:
    Their views fall in with ours.
  • To associate or begin to associate with:
    Fell in with the wrong crowd.
idiom
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fall on deaf ears
  • To go unheeded; be ignored completely:
idiom
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fall over backward
  • To overexert oneself to do or accomplish something:
    We fell over backward to complete the project on time.
idiom
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fall over (oneself)
  • To display inordinate, typically effusive, enthusiasm:
    Fell over themselves to impress the general's wife.
idiom
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fall prey to
  • To be put into such a vulnerable position as to be at risk of harm, destruction, or invasion:
    A person who fell prey to swindlers; did not want the country to fall prey to terrorists.
idiom
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fall short
  • To fail to attain a specified amount, level, or degree:
    An athlete whose skill fell far short of expectations.
  • To prove inadequate:
    Food supplies fell short.
idiom
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fall through the cracks
  • To pass unnoticed, neglected, or unchecked:
idiom
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fall to pieces
  • To break apart; disintegrate or collapse.
  • To become distraught or lose one's ability to cope.
idiom
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fall about (laughing)
  • to laugh uproariously or uncontrollably
idiom
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fall (all) over oneself
  • to behave in too eager or zealous a manner
idiom
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fall among
  • to come among by chance
idiom
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fall apart
  • to crumble, disintegrate, disunite, etc.
idiom
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fall away
  • to take away friendship, support, etc.; desert a person, cause, etc.
  • to become less in size, strength, etc.; specif., to grow thin and weak
idiom
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fall back
  • to withdraw; give way; retreat
idiom
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fall back on
  • to turn, or return, to for security or help
  • to retreat to
idiom
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fall behind
  • to be outdistanced; drop behind
  • to fail to pay on time; be in arrears
idiom
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fall down on
  • to fail or be unsuccessful in (a job, etc.)
idiom
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0
(informal) fall for
  • to fall in love with; become infatuated with
  • to be tricked or deceived by
idiom
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fall foul of
  • to collide with or become entangled with
  • to get into trouble or conflict with
idiom
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fall in
  • to collapse inward; cave in
  • to agree
  • to line up in proper formation
idiom
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fall in with
  • to meet by chance
  • to meet and join
  • to agree with; comply with
idiom
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fall off
  • to become smaller, less, lighter, etc.
  • to become worse; decline
  • to swing away from the heading, often, specif., to leeward
idiom
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fall on
  • to attack
  • to be the duty of
idiom
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fall out
  • to have a disagreement or quarrel, as with a friend or relative, that leads to a breach with that person
  • to happen; result
  • to leave one's place in a formation
idiom
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fall short
  • to be lacking
  • to fail to meet a standard or goal
idiom
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fall through
  • to come to nothing; fail
idiom
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fall to
  • to begin; start
idiom
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fall under
  • to come under (an influence, etc.)
  • to be listed or classified as
idiom
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ride for a fall
  • to behave in a manner likely to cause one trouble or injury
idiom
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take the fall
  • to take the blame or suffer the consequences in place of someone else
idiom
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the Fall (of Man)
  • Adam's sin of yielding to temptation in eating the forbidden fruit, and his subsequent loss of grace
idiom
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the fall of the cards
  • the chance distribution of cards in a given deal
idiom
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0

Origin of fall

  • Middle English fallen from Old English feallan

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English fallen, from Old English feallan (“to fall, fail, decay, die, attack”), from Proto-Germanic *fallaną (“to fall”), from Proto-Indo-European *pōl-, *spōl- (“to fall”). Cognate with West Frisian falle (“to fall”), Low German fallen (“to fall”), Dutch vallen (“to fall”), German fallen (“to fall”), Icelandic falla (“to fall”), Lithuanian pùlti, Ancient Greek σφάλλω (sphállō, “bring down, destroy, cause to stumble, deceive”).

    From Wiktionary