Sin meaning

sĭn
To sin is defined as to go against a rule or law, especially one of God's.

An example of to sin is to steal.

verb
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Social Insurance Number: in Canada, an individual number containing nine digits and used by the government to identify a person for the paying of taxes and the receipt of pensions and other government benefits.
abbreviation
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The definition of a sin is an offense against moral rules or law, especially against God.

An example of a sin is murder.

noun
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One of the two forms of the 21st letter of the Hebrew alphabet, distinguished from the letter shin by having a dot above the left side of the letter.
noun
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A transgression of a religious or moral law, especially when deliberate.
noun
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Sine.
abbreviation
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The Babylonian god of the moon.
noun
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The twenty-first letter of the Hebrew alphabet (שׂ)
noun
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A sin offering; a sacrifice for sin.
noun
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A letter of the Hebrew alphabet; שׂ
noun
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A letter of the Arabic alphabet; س
noun
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To violate a religious or moral law.
verb
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(trigonometry) Sine.
abbreviation
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Abbreviation of sine.
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An offense against any law, standard, code, etc.

A sin against good taste.

noun
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Something regarded as being shameful, deplorable, or utterly wrong.
noun
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To commit a sin.
verb
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(theology) A violation of God's will or religious law.

I'm Christian and I think that's a sin against God.

noun
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noun
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An embodiment of sin; a very wicked person.
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(intransitive, theology) To commit a sin.
verb
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live in sin
  • To cohabit in a sexual relationship without being married.
idiom
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as sin
  • Completely or extremely:
    He is guilty as sin.
idiom
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live in sin
  • to live together as spouses although not legally married; cohabit
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of sin

  • Middle English sinne from Old English synn es- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Hebrew śîn modeled on šîn shin (the following letter)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Akkadian Sîn

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English sinne, synne, sunne, zen, from Old English sinn, senn, synn (“injury, mischief, enmity, feud; sin, guilt, crime"), from Proto-Germanic *sunjō (“truth, excuse") and Proto-Germanic *sundijō, *sundiz (“sin"), from Proto-Indo-European *sent-, *sont- ("being, true", implying a verdict of "truly guilty" against an accusation or charge), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁es- (“to be"); compare Old English sōþ ("true, very, sooth"; see sooth).

    From Wiktionary

  • Modification of shin.

    From Wiktionary