Shin meaning

shĭn
A cut of meat from the lower foreleg of beef cattle.
noun
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To kick or hit in the shins.
verb
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One of the two forms of the 21st letter of the Hebrew alphabet, distinguished from the letter sin by having a dot above the right side of the letter.
noun
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The front part of the leg between the knee and the ankle.
noun
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To climb something by shinning it.
verb
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To move quickly on foot.
verb
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A cut of beef from the lower foreleg.
noun
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To climb a rope, pole, etc. by using both hands and legs for gripping.
verb
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The twenty-second letter of the Hebrew alphabet (שׁ)
noun
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The front part of the leg below the knee and above the ankle.
noun
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The shinbone.
noun
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The front part of the leg below the knee; the front edge of the shin bone.
noun
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noun
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(UK, as "shin up") To climb a mast, tree, rope, or the like, by embracing it alternately with the arms and legs, without help of steps, spurs, or the like.

To shin up a mast.

verb
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To strike with the shin.
verb
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(US, slang) To run about borrowing money hastily and temporarily, as when trying to make a payment.

verb
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The twenty-first letter of many Semitic alphabets/abjads (Phoenician, Aramaic, Hebrew, Syriac, Arabic and others).
noun
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To climb (a rope or pole, for example) by gripping and pulling alternately with the hands and legs.
verb
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1

Origin of shin

  • Middle English shine from Old English scinu skei- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Hebrew šîn of Phoenician origin šnn in Semitic roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English shine, from Old English scinu, from Proto-Germanic *skinō. Cognate with West Frisian skine, Dutch scheen, German Schiene.

    From Wiktionary

  • Ultimately from Proto-Semitic *śamš- (“sun”). Compare Shamash.

    From Wiktionary