Money meaning

mŭnē
The official currency, coins, and negotiable paper notes issued by a government.
noun
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Money is currency used to buy goods and services or having a lot of wealth.

An example of money is a dollar bill.

An example of money is what a person has if they are a millionaire.

noun
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A wealthy person, family, or group.

To come from old money; to marry into money.

noun
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A medium that can be exchanged for goods and services and is used as a measure of their values on the market, including among its forms a commodity such as gold, an officially issued coin or note, or a deposit in a checking account or other readily liquefiable account.
noun
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Assets and property considered in terms of monetary value; wealth.
noun
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Property; possessions; wealth.
noun
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Any definite or indefinite sum of money.
noun
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An amount of cash or credit.

Raised the money for the new playground.

noun
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Sums of money, especially of a specified nature.

State tax moneys; monies set aside for research and development.

noun
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An instrument that serves as a medium of exchange, has a standard of value, and is a means to save or store purchasing power. In the United States, money takes the form of paper currency and coins issued by the U.S. Treasury. Paper notes and coins issued by other governments also are considered money. Gold, silver and other metals have been used as money in the past with limited usage now.
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Very wealthy persons or groups.
noun
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Any form or denomination of legally current money.
noun
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Money won as a prize.
noun
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Sums of money.
noun
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He was born with money.

noun
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An item of value between two parties used for the exchange of goods or services.
noun
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Any substance or article used as money, as bank notes, checks, etc.
noun
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An official, government-created token of value, made of paper or metal, that may be exchanged for goods or services.
noun
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A legally or socially binding conceptual contract of entitlement to wealth, void of intrinsic value, payable for all debts and taxes, and regulated in supply.
noun
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A generally accepted means of exchange and measure of value.

Before colonial times cowry shells imported from Mauritius were used as money in Western Africa.

noun
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A currency maintained by a state or other entity which can guarantee its value (such as a monetary union).
noun
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Hard cash in the form of banknotes and coins, as opposed to cheques/checks, credit cards, or credit more generally.
noun
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The total value of liquid assets available for an individual or other economic unit, such as cash and bank deposits.
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(as a modifier) Of or pertaining to money; monetary.

Money supply; money market.

noun
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A person who funds an operation.
noun
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for (one's) money
  • According to one's opinion, choice, or preference:
    For my money, it's not worth the trouble.
idiom
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in the money
  • Rich; affluent.
  • Taking first, second, or third place in a contest on which a bet has been placed, such as a horserace.
idiom
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on the money
  • Exact; precise.
idiom
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(sports & games) put money on
  • To place a bet on.
idiom
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(slang) put (one's) money where (one's) mouth is
  • To live up to one's words; act according to one's own advice.
idiom
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for my money
  • in my opinion
  • as to my preference
idiom
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have money to burn
  • to have more money than one needs, so that some can be spent foolishly
idiom
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(slang) in the money
  • among the winners, as in a contest, race, etc.
  • prosperous; wealthy; successful
idiom
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make money
  • to gain profits; become wealthy
idiom
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one's money's worth
  • full value or benefit
idiom
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(slang) on the money
  • exact; correct
    The prediction was right on the money.
idiom
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put money into
  • to invest money in
idiom
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put money on
  • to bet on
idiom
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throw good money after bad
  • to put even more money into a failing investment, in a misguided attempt to save or sustain it
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of money

  • Middle English moneie from Old French from Latin monēta mint, coinage from Monēta epithet of Juno, temple of Juno of Rome where money was coined

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English moneie, moneye, from Old French moneie (“money"), from Latin monÄ“ta, from the name of the temple of Juno Moneta in Rome, where a mint was. Displaced native Middle English schat (“money, treasure") (from Old English sceatt (“money, treasure, coin")), Middle English feoh (“money, property") (from Old English feoh (“money, property, cattle")).

    From Wiktionary