Talent definition

tălənt
Frequency:
Any natural ability or power; natural endowment.
noun
27
4
A superior, apparently natural ability in the arts or sciences or in the learning or doing of anything.
noun
15
4
Any of various large units of weight or of money (the value of a talent weight in gold, silver, etc.) used in ancient Greece, Rome, the Middle East, etc.
noun
6
3
(business, media, sports) People of talent, viewed collectively; a talented person. [from 19th c.]

The director searched their talent pool to fill the new opening.

noun
4
1
After Matthew 25, above: A marked natural ability or skill. [from 15th c.]

He has the talent of touching his nose with his tongue.

noun
3
0
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(slang) The men or (especially) women of a place or area, judged by their attractiveness. [from 20th c.]

Not much talent in this bar tonight - let's hit the clubs.

noun
3
0
People collectively, or a person, with talent.

To encourage young talent.

noun
4
2
Talent is natural skill or ability or a person who has a natural skill or ability in something.

An example of talent is the ability to sing well.

An example of talent is the movie stars used in a film.

noun
3
1
(historical) A unit of weight and money used in ancient times in Greece, the Roman Empire, and the Middle East. [from 9th c.]
noun
3
1
A variable unit of weight and money used in ancient Greece, Rome, and the Middle East.
noun
2
0
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Natural endowment or ability of a superior quality.

The play has a cast of immense talent.

noun
1
0
A person or group of people having such ability.

The company makes good use of its talent.

noun
1
0
A marked innate ability, as for artistic accomplishment.

Has a rare talent for music.

noun
1
1

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
talent
Plural:
talents

Origin of talent

  • Middle English inclination, disposition from Old French from Medieval Latin from Latin balance, sum of money from Greek talanton telə- in Indo-European roots Sense 3, Middle English from Old English talente from Latin talenta pl. of talentum from Greek talanton

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Old English talente, from plural of Latin talentum (“a Grecian weight; a talent of money"), from Ancient Greek τάλαντον (talanton, “balance, a particular weight, especially of gold, sum of money, a talent"). Later senses reinforced by Old French talent (“a talent, also will, inclination, desire").

    From Wiktionary