Kite meaning

kīt
To use (a check) in furtherance of a check kiting scheme.
verb
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Kite means to issue a check for more than the balance in the checking account.

An example of kite is to issue a check for $100 when there is only $25 in the account.

verb
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To get money or credit by using bad checks, etc.
verb
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To issue (a bad check, etc.) as a kite.
verb
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Any of falconiform birds of prey in the subfamily Elaninae of the family Accipitridae with long wings and weak legs, feeding mostly on carrion and spending long periods soaring.

A pair of kites built a nest on the cliff.

noun
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Any of various accipitrine birds with long, pointed wings and, usually, a forked tail: they prey esp. on insects, reptiles, and small mammals.
noun
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A greedy, grasping person.
noun
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A light frame, usually of wood, covered with paper, cloth, or plastic, to be flown in the wind at the end of a string.
noun
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The topmost sails of a ship, for use in a light breeze.
noun
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A bad check or similar fictitious or worthless financial instrument used to raise money or maintain credit temporarily.
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A lightweight toy or other device carried on the wind and tethered and controlled from the ground by one or more lines.

On windy spring days, we would fly kites.

noun
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A tethered object which deflects its position in a medium by obtaining lift and drag in reaction with its relative motion in the medium.
noun
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(geometry) A quadrilateral having two pairs of edges of equal length, the edges of each pair being consecutive.

Four-sided figures without parallel sides include trapezoids and kites.

noun
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(banking) A fraudulent draft, such as a check one drawn on insufficient funds or with altered face value.
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(astrology) A planetary configuration wherein one planet of a grand trine is in opposition to an additional fourth planet.
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(slang) An aircraft, or aeroplane.
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(sailing, dated) A lightweight sail set above the topgallants, such as a studding-sail.
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(sailing, slang) A spinnaker.
noun
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(US, slang, prison) A short letter.
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(figuratively) A rapacious person.
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(UK, dialect) A fish, the brill.
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(rare, usually with "go") To fly a kite.

I'm going kiting this weekend.

verb
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To glide in the manner of a kite.

The wind kited us toward shore.

verb
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To travel by kite, as when kitesurfing.

We spent the afternoon kiting around the bay.

verb
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To toss or cast.
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(banking) To write a check on an account with insufficient funds, expecting that funds will become available by the time the check clears.

He was convicted of kiting checks and sentenced to two years in prison.

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(video games) To keep ahead of (a pursuing monster or mob) in order to attack it repeatedly from a distance, without exposing oneself to danger.
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(nautical, engineering) To deflect sideways in the water.
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(US, slang, prison) To send a short letter.
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(US, slang) To steal.
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(UK dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) The stomach; belly.
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The definition of a kite is a predatory bird with a forked tail and pointed wings that hunts for food while flying during the day.

An example of a kite is a large forked tail bird eating a dead animal in the road.

noun
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A quadrilateral with two distinct pairs of congruent, adjacent sides.
noun
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Any of the light sails of a ship that are used only in a light wind.
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Any of various graceful predatory birds of the family Accipitridae, having long pointed wings and often a forked tail.
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An instance of check kiting.
noun
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To fly like a kite; soar or glide.
verb
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To get money or credit with a kite.
verb
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(US) To cause an increase, especially in costs.

Rising interest rates have kited the cost of housing.

verb
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A kite is defined as a light weight, framed piece of fabric or paper attached to a roll of string that is flown in the air by wind currents.

An example of a kite is a brightly colored dragon being flown in the air on a breezy day in the park.

noun
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go fly a kite!
  • Go away and stop being a bother!.
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of kite

  • Middle English bird of prey from Old English cȳta

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Origin uncertain. Possibly from Middle English *kit, *kid (attested only in compounds: kidney), from Old English cwiþ (“belly, womb”), from Proto-Germanic *kweþuz (“stomach, belly”), from Proto-Indo-European *gʷet-, *gut- (“swelling, rounding; stomach, entrails”), from Proto-Indo-European *gʷu-, *gū- (“to bend, curve, bow, vault, distend”). Cognate with Icelandic kýta (“stomach of a fish, roe”), West Flemish kijte, kiete (“fleshy part of the body”), Middle Low German kūt (“entrails”), Icelandic kviður (“stomach”), kviði (“womb”).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English kite, kete, from Old English cȳta (“kite, bittern”), from Proto-Germanic *kūtijô, diminutive of *kūts (“bird of prey”), from Proto-Indo-European *gū- (“to cry, screech”). Cognate with Scots kyt, kyte (“kite, bird of prey”), Middle High German kiuzelīn, kützlīn (“owling”), German Kauz (“barn owl, screech owl”).

    From Wiktionary