Soar meaning

sôr
To rise or fly high into the air.
verb
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1
To increase or improve suddenly above the normal or usual level.

Sales soared. Our spirits soared.

verb
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To soar is to go above normal levels, or to coast through the air.

An example of soar is when prices rapidly rise.

An example of soar is when a bird coasts through the air.

verb
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2
The act of soaring.
noun
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The act of soaring.
noun
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The altitude or scope attained in soaring.
noun
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To fly, sail, or glide along high in the air.
verb
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To glide along without engine power, maintaining or gaining altitude on currents of air.
verb
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To rise well above the usual or ordinary level or bounds; be elevated.

Soaring prices, soaring spirits.

verb
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To reach by soaring.
verb
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Soaring range or height.
noun
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To fly aloft with little effort, as a bird.

When soars Gaul's vulture with his wings unfurled. Byron.

verb
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To mount upward on wings, or as on wings.
verb
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To fly by means of a glider or other unpowered aircraft.
verb
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To rise, especially rapidly or unusually high.

The pump prices soared into new heights as the strike continued.

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(figuratively) To rise in thought, spirits, or imagination; to be exalted in mood.

Where the deep transported mind may soar. John Milton.

Valor soars above What the world calls misfortune. Joseph Addison.

verb
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The act of soaring.

This apparent soar of the hooded falcon. Samuel Taylor Coleridge.

noun
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An upward flight.
noun
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Origin of soar

  • Middle English soren from Old French essorer from Vulgar Latin exaurāre Latin ex- ex- Latin aura air (from Greek aurā breeze aura)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From French s'essorer (“to soar"), essorer (“to dry (by exposing to the air)"), from Latin ex (“out") + aura (“the air, a breeze"), from Ancient Greek αὔρα (aura, “breath"). Compare aura, and exhale.

    From Wiktionary