Surge definition

sûrj
To increase suddenly.

As favorable reviews came out, interest in the software surged.

verb
16
1
To move like advancing waves.

The fans surged forward to see the movie star.

verb
8
3
To rise and move in a billowing or swelling manner.
verb
8
4
To roll or be tossed about on waves, as a boat.
verb
8
4
A sudden, sharp increase of electric current or voltage in a circuit.
noun
5
1
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To improve one's performance suddenly, especially in bettering one's standing in a competition.
verb
4
1
(nautical) To slip around a windlass. Used of a rope.
verb
4
1
To loosen or slacken (a cable) gradually.
verb
4
1
A powerful wave or swell of water.
noun
4
1
A movement of or like that of a mass of water; violent rolling, sweeping, or swelling motion.

The surge of the sea.

noun
4
1
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To increase suddenly or abnormally.
verb
3
1
To slip.
verb
3
1
To have a heavy, violent swelling motion; move in or as in a surge or surges.
verb
2
1
To rise and fall or be tossed about on waves, as a ship.
verb
2
1
To cause (a rope or cable) to slacken or slip.
verb
2
1
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A coastal rise in water level caused by wind.
2
1
Surge is defined as to quickly and suddenly move as part of a crowd, to increase rapidly and suddenly, or to cause someone to feel sudden and powerful emotions.

An example of surge is when you move forward because you are caught up in a crowd.

An example of surge is when profits dramatically go up.

An example of surge is when the power supply in your office suddenly increases.

An example of surge is a powerful emotion suddenly arising in a person.

verb
1
1
The definition of a surge is a sudden gust of something or a very sudden and dramatic increase.

An example of a surge is a crowd that suddenly and quickly moves forward.

An example of a surge is a sudden increase of electric current or voltage.

An example of a surge is when a companies profits go from $100,000 to $1,000,000.

An example of a surge is the act of being overcome with happiness and other emotions.

noun
0
0
A sudden rushing motion like that of a great wave.

The surge of the herd forced some animals into the river.

noun
0
0
The forward and backward motion of a ship subjected to wave action.
noun
0
0
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A sudden onrush or increase.

A surge of joy; a surge in prices.

noun
0
0
A period of intense effort that improves a competitor's standing, as in a race.
noun
0
0
A sudden, transient increase or oscillation in electric current or voltage.
noun
0
0
(astronomy) A brief increase in the intensity of solar activity such as X-ray emission, solar wind, solar flares, and prominences.
noun
0
0
The part of a windlass into which the cable surges.
noun
0
0
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A temporary release or slackening of a cable.
noun
0
0
Any sudden, strong increase, as of energy, enthusiasm, etc.
noun
0
0
A large mass of or as of moving water; wave; swell; billow.
noun
0
0
Such waves or billows collectively or in a series.
noun
0
0
The concave part of a capstan or windlass, upon which the rope surges, or slips.
noun
0
0
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Such a surging, or slipping.
noun
0
0
A strong, sudden, and transient spike in voltage or current. See also current and voltage.
0
0
An elevated voltage level lasting longer that a spike. See also ground loop, spike, and voltage.
0
0
noun
0
0
The maximum amplitude of a vehicle's forward/backward oscillation.

He felt a surge of excitement.

noun
0
0
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(electricity) A sudden electrical spike or increase of voltage and current.

A power surge at that generator created a blackout across the whole district.

noun
0
0
(nautical) The swell or heave of the sea. (FM 55-501).
noun
0
0
The tapered part of a windlass barrel or a capstan, upon which the cable surges, or slips.
noun
0
0
(intransitive) To rush, flood, or increase suddenly.

Toaster sales surged last year.

verb
0
0
To accelerate forwards, particularly suddenly.

A ship surges forwards, sways sideways and heaves up.

verb
0
0
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(nautical) To slack off a line.
verb
0
0

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
surge
Plural:
surges

Origin of surge

  • Probably French sourdre sourge- (from Old French) and French surgir to rise (from Old French to cast anchor) (from Old Catalan) both from Latin surgere to rise sub- from below sub– regere to lead straight reg- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English surgen, possibly from Middle French sourgir, from Old French surgir (“to rise, ride near the shore, arrive, land"), from Old Catalan surgir, from Latin surgere, contr. of surrigere, subrigere (“transitive lift up, raise, erect; intransitive rise, arise, get up, spring up, grow, etc."), from sub (“under") + regere (“to stretch"); see regent.

    From Wiktionary