Stream meaning

strēm
A steady current of a fluid.
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A large amount or number moving or occurring in steady succession.

A stream of commuters; a stream of insults.

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A beam or ray of light.
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A trend, course, or drift, as of opinion, thought, or history.
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The definition of a stream is a steady movement or flow of liquid.

An example of a stream is water pouring from a rain gutter during a storm.

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A course of study to which students are tracked.
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A steady flow of data.
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A flow of water in a channel or bed, as a brook, rivulet, or small river.
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A steady current in such a flow of water.
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To flow in a stream or current.
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To pour forth or give off a stream; flow.

My eyes were streaming with tears.

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To move or arrive in large numbers; pour.

Traffic was streaming by. Fan mail streamed in.

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To extend, wave, or float outward.

The banner streamed in the breeze.

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To leave a continuous trail of light.
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To give forth a continuous stream of light rays or beams; shine.
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To emit, discharge, or exude (a body fluid, for example).
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To transmit (audio or video content), especially over the Internet, in small, sequential packets that permit the content to be played continuously as it is being received and without saving it to a hard disk.
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A current or flow of water or other liquid, esp. one running along the surface of the earth; specif., a small river.
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A continuous series or succession.

A stream of cars.

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A trend or course.

The stream of events.

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Any of the sections formed when students within a grade level are grouped, as according to their abilities.
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A steady movement or flow of any fluid.

A stream of cold air.

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A steady movement or flow of rays of energy.

A stream of light.

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To flow in or as in a stream.
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To give off a stream; flow (with)

Eyes streaming with tears.

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To move steadily or continuously.
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To move swiftly; rush.

Fire streamed up the wall.

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To extend or stretch out; float; fly, as a flag in the breeze.
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To transmit data by streaming.
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To cause to stream.
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To transmit by streaming.
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A flow of water in a channel or bed, as a brook, rivulet, or small river.
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A flow of a watery substance, such as blood in blood vessels or cytoplasm in fungal hyphae, in an organism or in part of an organism.
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(1) To transmit live or on-demand audio or video content while users listen or watch. This was the original meaning of the term; however, it has evolved to become a synonym for "transmit" and is used to refer to transmitting wired or wireless from any source to a destination. See streaming.
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A small river; a large creek; a body of moving water confined by banks.
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A thin connected passing of a liquid through a lighter gas (e.g. air).

He poured the milk in a thin stream from the jug to the glass.

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Any steady flow or succession of material, such as water, air, radio signal or words.

Her constant nagging was to him a stream of abuse.

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(sciences) An umbrella term for all moving waters.
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(computing) A source or repository of data that can be read or written only sequentially.
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(UK, education) A division of a school year by perceived ability.

All of the bright kids went into the A stream, but I was in the B stream.

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(intransitive) To flow in a continuous or steady manner, like a liquid.
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To extend; to stretch out with a wavy motion; to float in the wind.

A flag streams in the wind.

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(Internet) To push continuous data (e.g. music) from a server to a client computer while it is being used (played) on the client.
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Origin of stream

From Middle English streem, strem, from Old English strÄ“am (“a stream, current, flowing water; flood"), from Proto-Germanic *straumaz (“stream"), from Proto-Indo-European *srowmos (“river"), from Proto-Indo-European *srew- (“to flow"). Cognate with Scots strem, streme, streym (“stream, river"), North Frisian strum (“stream"), West Frisian stream (“stream"), Low German Stroom (“stream"), Dutch stroom (“current, flow, stream"), German Strom (“current, stream"), Danish strøm (“current, stream, flow"), Swedish ström (“current, stream, flow"), Icelandic straumur (“current, stream, torrent, flood"), Ancient Greek ῥεῦμα (rheuma, “stream, flow"), Lithuanian srovÄ— (“current, stream").