Gutter meaning

gŭtər
Frequency:
A channel at the edge of a street or road for carrying off surface water.
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A furrow or groove formed by running water.
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A trough or channel for carrying something off, such as that on either side of a bowling alley or that almost level with the water in some swimming pools.
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A large groove (commonly behind animals) in a barn used for the collection and removal of animal excrement.
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The definition of a gutter is a narrow channel that directs and carries water to a specific location.

An example of a gutter is a metal trough attached to the roof of a house that collects and directs rain water away from the roof and the eaves.

An example of a gutter is a channel along the side of the road that carries water off the street to the sewer.

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A trough fixed under or along the eaves for draining rainwater from a roof.
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A degraded and squalid class or state of human existence.
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To form gutters or furrows in.

Heavy rain guttered the hillside.

verb
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To provide with gutters.
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To flow in channels or rivulets.

Rainwater guttered along the curb.

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To melt away through the side of the hollow formed by a burning wick. Used of a candle.
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To burn low and unsteadily; flicker.

The flame guttered in the lamp.

verb
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Vulgar, sordid, or unprincipled.

Gutter language; the gutter press.

adjective
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A channel along or under the eaves of a roof, to carry off rainwater.
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A narrow channel along the side of a road or street, to carry off water, as to a sewer.
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A place or state of living characterized by filth, poverty, squalor, etc.
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A channel or groove like a gutter, as the groove on either side of a bowling alley.
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The adjoining inner margins of two facing pages in a book, magazine, etc.
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To furnish with gutters; make gutters in.
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To flow in a stream.
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To melt rapidly so that the wax runs down the side in channels.
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In typography, the space between two columns.
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A prepared channel in a surface, especially at the side of a road adjacent to a curb, intended for the drainage of water.
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A ditch along the side of a road.
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A duct or channel beneath the eaves of a building to carry rain water; eavestrough.

The gutters must be cleared of leaves a few times a year.

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A groove down the sides of a bowling lane.
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Any narrow channel or groove, such as one formed by erosion in the vent of a gun from repeated firing.
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A space between printed columns of text.
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(philately) An unprinted space between rows of stamps.
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The part of a street meant for vehicles.
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The notional locus of things, acts, or events which are distasteful, ill bred or morally questionable.
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(figuratively) A low, vulgar state.

Get your mind out of the gutter.

What kind of gutter language is that? I ought to wash your mouth out with soap.

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Suitable for the gutter; vulgar, disreputable.
adjective
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To flow or stream; to form gutters. [from late 14th c.]
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(of a candle) To melt away or fail from becoming channeled on one side. [from early 18th c.]
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(of a small flame) To flicker as if about to be extinguished.
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To send (a bowling ball) into the gutter, not hitting any pins.
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To supply with a gutter or gutters.

verb
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To cut or form into small longitudinal hollows; to channel.

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One who or that which guts.
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(printing) The white space formed by the inner margins of two facing pages, as of a book.
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Origin of gutter

  • Middle English goter, guter from Old French gotier from gote drop from Latin gutta

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Anglo-Norman gotere, from Old French goutiere (French gouttière), ultimately from Latin gutta (“drop”)

    From Wiktionary

  • gut +‎ -er

    From Wiktionary