Lave meaning

lāv
To wash or bathe.
verb
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To lap or wash against.

Waves laved the shore.

verb
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To refresh or soothe as if by washing.
verb
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To flow along or against.
verb
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To dip or pour with or as with a ladle.
verb
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To wash or bathe.
verb
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What is left over.
noun
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To draw, as water; drink in.
verb
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To give bountifully; lavish.
verb
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(intransitive) To run down or gutter, as a candle.
verb
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(intransitive, dialectal) To hang or flap down.
verb
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(intransitive, archaic) To wash.
verb
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(archaic or dialectal) The remainder, rest; that which is left, remnant; others.
noun
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To wash; bathe.
verb
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1

Origin of lave

  • Middle English laven from Old English gelafian and from Old French laver both from Latin lavāre leu(ə)- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English laven (“to wash, pour out, stream"), from Old English lafian, Ä¡elafian (“to pour water on, refresh, wash"), from Proto-Germanic *labōnÄ… (“to refresh, strengthen"), from Proto-Indo-European *lōbh- (“to strengthen oneself, rest"). Cognate with Old Saxon lavōn (Dutch laven, “to refresh, revive"), Old High German labōn, labian (German laben, “to wash, refresh"), Ancient Greek λαπάζειν (lapazein), ἀλαπάζειν (lapázein, “to empty out, cleanse; to rest, refresh"). The sense of "wash" in West Germanic was reinforced due to association with unrelated Latin lavare (“to wash").
    From Wiktionary
  • From Middle English lave, laif, lafe (“remainder, rest, that which is left"), from Old English lāf (“lave, remainder, rest"), from Proto-Germanic *laibō (“remainder"), from Proto-Indo-European *lip- (“to stick, glue"). Cognate with Old High German leiba (“lave"), Old Norse leif (“lave"), Old English belÄ«fan (“to remain"). More at belive.
    From Wiktionary