Rest meaning

rĕst
That or those remaining.

The beginning was boring, but the rest was interesting. The rest are arriving later.

noun
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The part that is left over after something has been removed; remainder.
noun
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Rest is relaxation, sleep or the feeling brought on by enough sleep.

An example of rest is sitting down in a comfy chair after a long day.

noun
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To base or ground.

I rested my conclusion on that fact.

verb
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To complete the main presentation of (one's portion of a case).

The prosecutor was not ready to rest her case.

verb
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To fix or direct (the gaze, for example).
verb
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Refreshing ease or inactivity after work or exertion.
noun
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A period or occasion of inactivity, as during work or on a journey.
noun
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The repose of death.
noun
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Absence of motion; state of being still; immobility.
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A resting or stopping place; shelter or lodging place, as for travelers, sailors, etc.
noun
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The condition of being settled or resolved.

A remark that put the matter to rest.

noun
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A short pause in a line of poetry; a caesura.
noun
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The state of being motionless; the absence of motion.

The car accelerates quickly from a state of rest.

noun
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A device used as a support.

A back rest.

noun
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To complete the main presentation of one's portion of a legal case.

The defense rests.

verb
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To cause or allow to be inactive or relaxed so as to regain energy.

The coach rested his best players. I rested my eyes before studying.

verb
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To place, lay, or lean, as for support or repose.

Rested the rake against the fence.

verb
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A support for a lance on the side of the breastplate of medieval armor.
noun
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A thing or device for supporting something; support.

A footrest.

noun
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A short pause in a line of verse; caesura.
noun
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To get ease and refreshment by ceasing from work or exertion.
verb
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To be at ease or at peace; be tranquil.
verb
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To be dead.
verb
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To be or become quiet, still, or inactive for a while.
verb
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To remain without change or further action.

To let a matter rest.

verb
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To be, or seem to be, supported.
  • To lie, sit, or lean.
  • To be placed, based, or founded (in, on, upon, etc.).
verb
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To be placed or imposed as a burden or responsibility.
verb
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To be or lie.

The fault rests with him.

verb
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To be directed or fixed.

My eyes rested on the picture.

verb
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To rely; depend.
verb
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To remain unplowed or uncropped; lie fallow.
verb
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To end voluntarily the introduction of evidence in a case.
verb
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To give rest to; refresh by rest.
verb
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To place, put, or lay for ease, support, etc.

To rest one's head on a pillow.

verb
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To base; ground.

To rest an argument on trivialities.

verb
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To direct or fix (the eyes, etc.)
verb
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To bring to rest; stop.
verb
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To end voluntarily the introduction of evidence in (a case)
verb
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What is left after part is taken away; remainder.
noun
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The others.
noun
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To cause to remain; keep.

“God rest ye merry, gentlemen”

verb
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A support for the butt of a lance, projecting from the side of the breastplate in medieval armor.
noun
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(1) Rest and relaxation. See digital vacation.
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Restitution.
abbreviation
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(uncountable, of a person or animal) Relief from work or activity by sleeping; sleep.

I need to get a good rest tonight; I was up late last night.

The sun sets, and the workers go to their rest.

noun
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(countable) Any relief from exertion; a state of quiet and relaxation.

We took a rest at the top of the hill to get our breath back.

noun
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It was nice to have a rest from the phone ringing when I unplugged it for a while.

noun
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(uncountable, of an object or concept) A state of inactivity; a state of little or no motion; a state of completion.

The boulder came to rest just behind the house after rolling down the mountain.

The ocean was finally at rest.

Now that we're all in agreement, we can put that issue to rest.

noun
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(euphemistic, uncountable) A final position after death.

She was laid to rest in the village cemetery.

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(music, countable) A pause of a specified length in a piece of music.

Remember there's a rest at the end of the fourth bar.

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(music, countable) A written symbol indicating such a pause in a musical score such as in sheet music.
noun
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(physics, uncountable) Absence of motion.

The body's centre of gravity may affect its state of rest.

noun
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(snooker, countable) A stick with a U-, V- or X-shaped head used to support the tip of a cue when the cue ball is otherwise out of reach.

Higgins can't quite reach the white with his cue, so he'll be using the rest.

noun
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(countable) Any object designed to be used to support something else.

She put the phone receiver back in its rest.

He placed his hands on the arm rests of the chair.

noun
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A projection from the right side of the cuirass of armour, serving to support the lance.
noun
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A place where one may rest, either temporarily, as in an inn, or permanently, as, in an abode.
noun
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(poetry) A short pause in reading poetry; a caesura.
noun
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The striking of a balance at regular intervals in a running account.
noun
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(dated) A set or game at tennis.
noun
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(object designed to be used to support something else): arm rest, elbow rest, foot rest, head rest, leg rest, neck rest, wrist rest.
hyponyms
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(pause of specified length in a piece of music): breve rest, demisemiquaver rest, hemidemisemiquaver rest, minim rest, quaver rest, semibreve rest, semiquaver rest.
hyponyms
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(intransitive) To cease from action, motion, work, or performance of any kind; stop; desist; be without motion.
verb
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(intransitive) To come to a pause or an end; end.
verb
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(intransitive) To be free from that which harasses or disturbs; be quiet or still; be undisturbed.
verb
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(intransitive, reflexive) To be or to put into a state of rest.
  • 2011 September 29, Jon Smith, “Tottenham 3-1 Shamrock Rovers", BBC Sport.
    With the north London derby to come at the weekend, Spurs boss Harry Redknapp opted to rest many of his key players, although he brought back Aaron Lennon after a month out through injury.

My day's work is over; now I will rest. We need to rest the horses before we ride any further. I shall not rest until I have uncovered the truth. Rest assured that I will do my best.

verb
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(intransitive) To stay, remain, be situated.

The blame seems to rest with your father.

verb
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(intransitive, reflexive) To lean, lie, or lay.

A column rests on its pedestal.

I rested my head in my hands. She rested against my shoulder. I rested against the wall for a minute.

verb
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(intransitive, law, US) To complete one's active advocacy in a trial or other proceeding, and thus to wait for the outcome (however, one is still generally available to answer questions, etc.)

The defense rests, your Honor. I rest my case.

verb
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(intransitive) To sleep; slumber.
verb
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(intransitive) To lie dormant.
verb
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(intransitive) To sleep the final sleep; sleep in death; die; be dead.
verb
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(intransitive) To rely or depend on.

The decision rests on getting a bank loan.

verb
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To be satisfied; to acquiesce.
verb
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(uncountable) That which remains.

She ate some of the food, but was not hungry enough to eat it all, so she put the rest in the refrigerator to finish later.

noun
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Those not included in a proposition or description; the remainder; others.
noun
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(UK, finance) A surplus held as a reserved fund by a bank to equalize its dividends, etc.; in the Bank of England, the balance of assets above liabilities.
noun
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(obsolete) To remain.
verb
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(obsolete) To arrest.
verb
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To be or continue to be; remain.

Rest assured that we will finish on time.

verb
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To remain or be left over.
verb
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To go on being; continue to be; remain (as specified)

Rest assured that we will go.

verb
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at rest
  • Motionless; inactive.
  • Free from anxiety or distress.
idiom
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lay
  • To bury (a dead body); inter.
  • To resolve or settle (an issue, for example):.
    The judge's ruling put to rest the dispute between the neighbors.
idiom
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at rest
  • In a state of rest.
idiom
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lay to rest
  • To bury (a dead person).
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of rest

  • Middle English from Old French reste from rester to remain from Latin restāre to stay behind re- re- stāre to stand stā- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English reste short for areste a stopping, holding from Old French from arester to stop arrest

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English rest, reste, from Old English rest, ræst (“rest, quiet, freedom from toil, repose, sleep, resting-place, a bed, couch, grave"), from Proto-Germanic *rastō, *rastijō (“rest"), from Proto-Indo-European *ros-, *res-, *erH- (“rest"). Cognate with West Frisian rêst (“rest"), Dutch rust (“rest"), German Rast (“rest"), Swedish rast (“rest"), Norwegian rest (“rest"), Icelandic röst (“rest"), Old Irish árus (“dwelling"), German Ruhe (“calm"), Albanian resht (“to stop, pause"), Welsh araf (“quiet, calm, gentle"), Lithuanian rovà (“calm"), Ancient Greek ἐρωή (erōē, “rest, respite"), [script?] Avestan [script?] (airime, “calm, peaceful"), Sanskrit रमते (rámate, “he stays still, calms down"), Gothic 𐍂𐌹𐌼𐌹𐍃 (rimis, “tranquility"). Related to roo.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English resten, from Old English restan (“to rest, cease from toil, be at rest, sleep, rest in death, lie dead, lie in the grave, remain unmoved or undisturbed, be still, rest from, remain, lie"), from Proto-Germanic *rastijanÄ… (“to rest"), from Proto-Indo-European *ros-, *res-, *erH- (“rest"). Cognate with Dutch rusten (“to rest"), Middle Low German resten (“to rest"), German rasten (“to rest"), Danish raste (“to rest"), Swedish rasta (“to rest").

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English reste, from Old French reste from Old French rester (“to remain") from Latin restare (“to stay back, stay behind") from re- +"Ž stare (to stand). Replaced native Middle English lave (“rest, remainder") (from Old English lāf (“remnant, remainder")).

    From Wiktionary

  • Aphetic form of arrest.

    From Wiktionary