Rest Definition

rĕst
rested, resting, rests
noun
rests
Peace, ease, and refreshment as produced by sleep.
Webster's New World
Sleep or repose, or a period of this.
Webster's New World
Refreshing ease or inactivity after work or exertion.
Webster's New World
A period or occasion of inactivity, as during work or on a journey.
Webster's New World
The repose of death.
Webster's New World
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verb
rested, resting, rests
To get peace, ease, and refreshment by sleeping, lying down, etc.
Webster's New World
To give rest to; refresh by rest.
Webster's New World
To cease motion, work, or activity, especially in order to become refreshed.
The laborers rested in the shade.
American Heritage
To sleep.
Webster's New World
To get ease and refreshment by ceasing from work or exertion.
Webster's New World
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abbreviation
Restitution.
Wiktionary
other
(object designed to be used to support something else): arm rest, elbow rest, foot rest, head rest, leg rest, neck rest, wrist rest.
Wiktionary
(pause of specified length in a piece of music): breve rest, demisemiquaver rest, hemidemisemiquaver rest, minim rest, quaver rest, semibreve rest, semiquaver rest.
Wiktionary
idiom
at rest
  • Motionless; inactive.
American Heritage
lay
  • To bury (a dead body); inter.
  • To resolve or settle (an issue, for example):

    The judge's ruling put to rest the dispute between the neighbors.

American Heritage
at rest
  • in a state of rest
Webster's New World
lay to rest
  • to bury (a dead person)
Webster's New World
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Other Word Forms of Rest

Noun

Singular:
rest
Plural:
rests

Idioms, Phrasal Verbs Related to Rest

Origin of Rest

  • From Middle English rest, reste, from Old English rest, ræst (“rest, quiet, freedom from toil, repose, sleep, resting-place, a bed, couch, grave"), from Proto-Germanic *rastō, *rastijō (“rest"), from Proto-Indo-European *ros-, *res-, *erH- (“rest"). Cognate with West Frisian rêst (“rest"), Dutch rust (“rest"), German Rast (“rest"), Swedish rast (“rest"), Norwegian rest (“rest"), Icelandic röst (“rest"), Old Irish árus (“dwelling"), German Ruhe (“calm"), Albanian resht (“to stop, pause"), Welsh araf (“quiet, calm, gentle"), Lithuanian rovà (“calm"), Ancient Greek ἐρωή (erōē, “rest, respite"), [script?] Avestan [script?] (airime, “calm, peaceful"), Sanskrit रमते (rámate, “he stays still, calms down"), Gothic 𐍂𐌹𐌼𐌹𐍃 (rimis, “tranquility"). Related to roo.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English resten, from Old English restan (“to rest, cease from toil, be at rest, sleep, rest in death, lie dead, lie in the grave, remain unmoved or undisturbed, be still, rest from, remain, lie"), from Proto-Germanic *rastijanÄ… (“to rest"), from Proto-Indo-European *ros-, *res-, *erH- (“rest"). Cognate with Dutch rusten (“to rest"), Middle Low German resten (“to rest"), German rasten (“to rest"), Danish raste (“to rest"), Swedish rasta (“to rest").

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English reste, from Old French reste from Old French rester (“to remain") from Latin restare (“to stay back, stay behind") from re- +"Ž stare (to stand). Replaced native Middle English lave (“rest, remainder") (from Old English lāf (“remnant, remainder")).

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English from Old French reste from rester to remain from Latin restāre to stay behind re- re- stāre to stand stā- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English reste short for areste a stopping, holding from Old French from arester to stop arrest

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Aphetic form of arrest.

    From Wiktionary

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