Predicate definition

prĕdĭ-kāt
To state or affirm as an attribute or quality of something.

The sermon predicated the perfectibility of humankind.

verb
9
2
To base or establish (a statement or action, for example).

I predicated my argument on the facts.

verb
8
3
(grammar) Of or belonging to the predicate of a sentence or clause.
adjective
4
0
(logic) To make (a term or expression) the predicate of a proposition.
verb
7
4
Stated or asserted; predicated.
adjective
3
0
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To proclaim or assert; declare.
verb
3
2
To affirm or base (something) on or upon given facts, arguments, conditions, etc.
verb
1
0
To imply or connote.
verb
1
0
(gram.) The verb or verbal phrase, including any complements, objects, and modifiers, that is one of the two immediate constituents of a sentence and asserts something about the subject.
noun
1
0
(logic) Something that is affirmed or denied about the subject of a proposition (Ex.: green in “grass is green”)
noun
1
0
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(gram.) Being or forming part of the predicate of a sentence.

A predicate adjective.

adjective
1
0
(grammar) The part of the sentence (clause) which states something about the subject or the object of the sentence.

In "The dog barked very loudly", the subject is "the dog" and the predicate is "barked very loudly".

noun
1
0
(logic) A term of a statement, where the statement may be true or false depending on whether the thing referred to by the values of the statement's variables has the property signified by that (predicative) term.

A nullary predicate is a proposition. Also, an instance of a predicate whose terms are all constant "” e.g., P(2,3) "” acts as a proposition.

A predicate can be thought of as either a relation (between elements of the domain of discourse) or as a truth-valued function (of said elements).

A predicate is either valid, satisfiable, or unsatisfiable.

There are two ways of binding a predicate's variables: one is to assign constant values to those variables, the other is to quantify over those variables (using universal or existential quantifiers). If all of a predicate's variables are bound, the resulting formula is a proposition.

noun
1
0
To make a statement or assertion.
verb
1
1
(grammar) One of the two main constituents of a sentence or clause, modifying the subject and including the verb, objects, or phrases governed by the verb, as opened the door in Jane opened the door or is very sleepy in The child is very sleepy.
noun
1
1
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(logic) That part of a proposition that is affirmed or denied about the subject. For example, in the proposition We are mortal, mortal is the predicate.
noun
1
1
To predicate is to agree that something is a quality or property of someone.

An example of predicate is to confirm the kindness of someone who has recently made a large contribution to a charity.

verb
0
0
Predicate is a grammar term used to describe the part of the sentence which talks about the subject and which has a verb.

An example of predicate is "ate lunch" in the sentence "Mary ate lunch."

noun
0
0
To affirm as a quality, attribute, or property of a person or thing.

To predicate the honesty of another's motives.

verb
0
0
(logic) To assert (something) about the subject of a proposition.
verb
0
0
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(computing) An operator or function that returns either true or false.
noun
0
0
To announce or assert publicly.
verb
0
0
(logic) To state, assert.
verb
0
0
verb
0
0
(originally US) To base (on); to assert on the grounds of.
verb
0
0
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(obs.) To proclaim; preach; declare; affirm.
verb
1
2
To make an affirmation or statement.
verb
0
1
To carry the connotation of; imply.
verb
2
4

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
predicate
Plural:
predicates

Origin of predicate

  • Late Latin praedicāre praedicāt- from Latin to proclaim prae- pre- dicāre to proclaim deik- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle French predicate (French prédicat), from post-classical Late Latin praedicatum (“thing said of a subject"), a noun use of the neuter past participle of praedicare (“proclaim"), as Etymology 2, below.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Latin predicātus, perfect passive participle of praedicō, from prae + dicō (“declare, proclaim"), from dicō (“say, tell").

    From Wiktionary