Ground meaning

ground
The definition of ground is base or beginning.

An example of ground is the first class in a set course of several classes.

adjective
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Ground is defined as the surface of or soil from the earth.

An example of ground is dirt.

noun
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The definition of ground refers to being cut up into small pieces or into a powder.

An example of ground are the powdery structure of spices after they have been crushed into particles.

adjective
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Ground means to cut up into small particles or to prevent an aircraft or pilot from flying.

An example of ground is the action by a grinder to cut up the coffee particles used to brew coffee.

An example of ground is to tell an aircraft pilot that his plane cannot take off until the fog lifts.

verb
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An area of land designated for a particular purpose.

A burial ground; parade grounds.

noun
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Something that serves as a foundation or means of attachment for something else.

A ground of white paint under the mural.

noun
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Soil; earth.

Level the ground for a lawn.

noun
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The land surrounding or forming part of a house or another building.

A guesthouse on the grounds of the mansion.

noun
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An area or a position that is contested in or as if in battle.

The soldiers held their ground against the enemy. Character witnesses helped the defendant stand her ground in the trial.

noun
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A surrounding area; a background.
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The foundation for an argument, belief, or action; a basis.
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The underlying condition prompting an action; a cause.

Grounds for suspicion; a ground for divorce.

noun
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An area of reference or discussion; a subject.

The professor covered new ground in every lecture.

noun
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A mesh background upon which patterns are worked in lace-making.
noun
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To place on or cause to touch the ground.
verb
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To supply with basic information; instruct in fundamentals.
verb
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To connect (an electric circuit) to a ground.
verb
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To run (a vessel) aground.
verb
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To touch or reach the ground.
verb
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To hit a ground ball.

Grounded to the second baseman.

verb
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To run aground.
verb
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The surface of the earth, specif. the solid surface.
noun
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The soil of the earth; earth; land.
noun
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Any particular area of reference, discussion, work, etc.; topic; subject.

Arguments covering the same ground.

noun
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Basis; foundation.
noun
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The logical basis of a conclusion, action, etc.; valid reason, motive, or cause.
noun
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The background or surface over which other parts are spread or laid, as the main surface of a painting.
noun
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The particles that settle to the bottom of a liquid; dregs; sediment.

Coffee grounds.

noun
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Of, on, or near the ground.
adjective
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Growing or living in or on the ground.
adjective
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Designating the part of the offensive game plan using running plays.
adjective
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To set on, or cause to touch, the ground.
verb
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To cause (a ship, etc.) to run aground.
verb
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To found on a firm basis; establish.
verb
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To base (a claim, argument, etc.) on something specified.
verb
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To instruct (a person) in the elements or first principles of.
verb
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To provide with a background.
verb
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To connect (an electrical conductor) to a ground.
verb
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To throw or knock (an opposing player) to the ground.
verb
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To strike the bottom or run ashore.
verb
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To throw an incomplete pass intentionally, to avoid being sacked.
verb
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verb
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A connection between an electrical conductor and the Earth. Grounds are used to establish a common zero-voltage reference for electric devices in order to prevent potentially dangerous voltages from arising between them and other objects.
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The set of shared points in an electrical circuit at which the measured voltage is taken to be zero. The ground is usually connected directly to the power supply and acts as a common “sink” for current flowing through the components in the circuit.
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A reference voltage level of "zero potential" for electric and electronic circuits. For most equipment plugged into an AC outlet, the word ground generally refers to the earth, and the metal parts are grounded ("chassis ground") to the earth for safety. In the case of a short circuit, the current flows through the green wire and third prong in the power cord (U.S. and Canada), which causes the circuit breaker to trip.Signal GroundPower supplies, circuit boards and signal pathways in most electronic equipment are also connected to the same earth ground as the chassis for reference voltage and safety. There are exceptions; for example, medical equipment that is attached to a patient is generally isolated from earth ground even when plugged in, because the time between a short circuit and the breaker tripping could prove fatal. Ethernet adapters and other networking equipment are also isolated from earth ground in order to prevent unbalanced ground loops from causing interference (see ground loop).Portable DevicesEvery portable, battery-operated device, such as a laptop and iPod, as well as the electrical systems in every vehicle, have their own zero reference voltage. Naturally, these systems are not connected to earth ground, but the reference voltage is still called ground.Building GroundsAt the electric panel in U.S. and Canadian buildings, the ground lines are wired to the neutral line of the electric service, to the earth via a ground rod and to the metal plumbing pipes. In large datacenters, a separate ground system may connect every server via heavy-duty cable to the metal structure of the building to ensure that the voltage reference between all equipment is the same. See ground loop.
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A conducting connection, whether intentional or accidental, by which an electric circuit is connected at some point to the earth, or to some other large conducting body that can serve in place of the earth. The point can be a single point common to a great many circuits, such as an equipment frame, chassis, or cabinet. A ground serves as a reference point, a return path for an electrical signal, and to carry current safely away from a circuit in the event of a fault. In the event that earth is not available as a ground, the conducting frame of an aircraft, spacecraft, or land vehicle not conductively connected to the earth can serve as ground. See also circuit, current, electricity, and signal.
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​(uncountable) The surface of the Earth, as opposed to the sky or water or underground.
  • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 23, The Mirror and the Lamp.
    If the afternoon was fine they strolled together in the park, very slowly, and with pauses to draw breath wherever the ground sloped upward. The slightest effort made the patient cough.
  • 2013 June 8, “The new masters and commanders”, The Economist, volume 407, number 8839, page 52.
    From the ground, Colombo’s port does not look like much. Those entering it are greeted by wire fences, walls dating back to colonial times and security posts.
noun
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(uncountable) Terrain.
noun
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(uncountable) Soil, earth.

The worm crawls through the ground.

noun
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(countable) The bottom of a body of water.
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The plain surface upon which the figures of an artistic composition are set.

Crimson flowers on a white ground.

noun
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In sculpture, a flat surface upon which figures are raised in relief.
noun
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In point lace, the net of small meshes upon which the embroidered pattern is applied.

Brussels ground.

noun
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In etching, a gummy substance spread over the surface of a metal to be etched, to prevent the acid from eating except where an opening is made by the needle.
noun
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(architecture, chiefly in the plural) One of the pieces of wood, flush with the plastering, to which mouldings etc. are attached.

Grounds are usually put up first and the plastering floated flush with them.

noun
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(countable) A soccer stadium.

Manchester United's ground is known as Old Trafford.

noun
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(electricity, Canada and US) An electrical conductor connected to the ground.
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(electricity, Canada and US) A level of electrical potential used as a zero reference.
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(countable, cricket) The area of grass on which a match is played (a cricket field); the entire arena in which it is played; the part of the field behind a batsman's popping crease where he can not be run out (hence to make one's ground).
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(music) A composition in which the bass, consisting of a few bars of independent notes, is continually repeated to a varying melody.
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(music) The tune on which descants are raised; the plain song.

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The pit of a theatre.

noun
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To connect (an electrical conductor or device) to a ground.
verb
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To punish, especially a child or teenager, by forcing him/her to stay at home and/or give up certain privileges.

If you don't clean your room, I'll be forced to ground you.

Carla, you are grounded until further notice for lying to us about where you were yesterday.

My kids are currently grounded from television.

verb
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To forbid (an aircraft or pilot) to fly.

Because of the bad weather, all flights were grounded.

verb
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To give a basic education in a particular subject; to instruct in elements or first principles.

Jim was grounded in maths.

verb
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(baseball) To hit a ground ball; to hit a ground ball which results in an out. Compare fly (verb(regular)) and line (verb).

Jones grounded to second in his last at-bat.

verb
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(cricket) (of a batsman) To place his bat, or part of his body, on the ground behind the popping crease so as not to be run out.
verb
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(intransitive) To run aground; to strike the bottom and remain fixed.

The ship grounded on the bar.

verb
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To found; to fix or set, as on a foundation, reason, or principle; to furnish a ground for; to fix firmly.
verb
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(fine arts) To cover with a ground, as a copper plate for etching, or as paper or other materials with a uniform tint as a preparation for ornament.
verb
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Simple past tense and past participle of grind.

I ground the coffee up nicely.

verb
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Crushed, or reduced to small particles.

Ground mustard seed.

adjective
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Processed by grinding.

Lenses of ground glass.

adjective
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To provide a basis for (a theory, for example); justify.
verb
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drive
  • To belabor (an issue or a subject).
idiom
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from the ground up
  • From the most basic level to the highest level; completely:.
    Designed the house from the ground up; learned the family business from the ground up.
idiom
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off the ground
  • Under way, as if in flight:.
    Because of legal difficulties, the construction project never got off the ground.
idiom
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on (one's) own ground
  • In a situation where one has knowledge or competence:.
    A sculptor back on her own ground after experiments with painting.
idiom
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on the ground
  • At a place that is exciting, interesting, or important:.
    A reporter who wanted to be on the ground when the story broke.
idiom
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to ground
  • Into a den or burrow:.
    A fox going to ground.
  • Into hiding.
idiom
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break ground
  • To dig; excavate.
  • To plow.
  • To start building.
  • To start any undertaking.
idiom
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break new ground
  • To innovate or pioneer.
idiom
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cover ground
  • To move or traverse a certain distance.
  • To make a certain amount of progress.
idiom
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cut the ground from under someone
  • To deprive someone of effective defense or argument.
idiom
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from the ground up
  • From the first or elementary principles, methods, etc. to the last or most advanced; completely; thoroughly.
idiom
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gain ground
  • To move forward.
  • To make progress.
  • To gain in strength, extent, popularity, etc.
idiom
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get off the ground
  • To get (something) started; begin or cause to begin to make progress.
idiom
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give ground
  • To withdraw under attack; retreat; yield.
idiom
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go to ground
  • To go into hiding or seclusion.
idiom
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hold one's ground
  • To keep one's position against attack or opposition; not withdraw or retreat.
idiom
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lose ground
  • To drop back; fall behind.
  • To lose in strength, extent, popularity, etc.
idiom
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make up ground
  • To reduce the distance by which one has fallen behind.
idiom
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on delicate ground
  • In a situation requiring tact.
idiom
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on firm ground
  • In a safe situation.
  • Firmly supported by facts or evidence.
idiom
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on one's own ground
  • Dealing with a situation or subject that one knows well.
  • At home.
idiom
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on the ground
  • At the site of the action.
    Wartime journalists on the ground.
  • Under practical conditions; in actual practice.
idiom
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run into the ground
  • To do too long or too often; overdo.
  • To mismanage to the point of ruin or near-ruin; destroy.
idiom
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shift one's ground
  • To change one's argument or defense.
idiom
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suit (right) down to the ground
  • To suit completely.
idiom
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thick on the ground
  • Plentiful; common.
idiom
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thin on the ground
  • Scarce; uncommon.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of ground

  • Middle English from Old English grund

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old English grund, from Proto-Germanic *grunduz, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰr̥mtu-. Cognate with West Frisian grûn, Dutch grond and German Grund. Non-Germanic cognates include Albanian grundë (“brittle earth”) and gryej (“to erode, crumble”).

    From Wiktionary

  • inflected form of grind See also milled.

    From Wiktionary