Proof meaning

pro͝of
Determination of the quality of something by testing; trial.

Put one's beliefs to the proof.

noun
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The alcoholic strength of a liquor, expressed by a number that is twice the percentage by volume of alcohol present.
noun
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Fully or successfully resistant; impervious. Often used in combination.

Waterproof watches; a fireproof cellar door.

adjective
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Of standard alcoholic strength.

Proof liquor.

adjective
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Used to proofread or correct typeset copy.

A proof copy of the manuscript.

adjective
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To treat so as to make resistant.

Proof a fabric against shrinkage.

verb
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To proofread.
verb
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To become properly light for cooking.

The batter proofed overnight.

verb
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The act or process of proving; a testing or trying of something.
noun
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Anything serving or tending to establish the truth of something, or to convince one of its truth; conclusive evidence.
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The establishment of the truth of something.

To work on the proof of a theory.

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A test or trial of the truth, worth, quality, etc. of something.

The proof of the pudding is in the eating.

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The quality or condition of having been tested or proved.
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Tested or proved strength, as of armor.
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A trial impression taken from a plate, block, or stone.
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All the facts, admissions, and conclusions drawn from evidence which together operate to determine a verdict or judgment.
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A process for checking the correctness of a computation, as, in a subtraction problem, by adding the difference to the subtrahend to get the minuend.
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Any of a limited number of coins of a new issue, struck with special care.
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A trial print of a negative.
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An impression of composed type taken for checking errors and making changes.
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Of tested and proved strength.
adjective
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Impervious or invulnerable to; able to resist, withstand, etc.

Proof against criticism.

adjective
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Used in proving or testing.
adjective
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Of standard strength.
adjective
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To make a proof of.
verb
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To make resistant or impervious to something.
verb
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verb
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Impervious to.

Waterproof.

affix
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Protected from or against.

Foolproof, rustproof.

affix
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Resistant to, unaffected by.

Fireproof.

affix
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A demonstration of the truth of a mathematical or logical statement, based on axioms and theorems derived from those axioms.
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An establishment by evidence of the truth or falseness of an alleged fact; evidence upon which a court’s judicial ruling is based.
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The responsibility placed on one party to bring forward evidence in support of his cause; as to a plaintiff (in a civil case) or a prosecutor (in a criminal case), the requirement of bringing forth sufficient evidence to support a finding in favor of plaintiff or the state.
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Level of proof required to sustain certain actions; varying levels of proof required include “beyond a reasonable doubt” (criminal cases), “by a preponderance of the evidence” (most civil cases), “clear and convincing evidence” (certain civil and some criminal cases, including fraud).
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(countable) An effort, process, or operation designed to establish or discover a fact or truth; an act of testing; a test; a trial.
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(uncountable) The degree of evidence which convinces the mind of any truth or fact, and produces belief; a test by facts or arguments which induce, or tend to induce, certainty of the judgment; conclusive evidence; demonstration.
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The quality or state of having been proved or tried; firmness or hardness which resists impression, or doesn't yield to force; impenetrability of physical bodies.
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(countable, printing) A proof sheet; a trial impression, as from type, taken for correction or examination.
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(countable, logic, mathematics) A sequence of statements consisting of axioms, assumptions, statements already demonstrated in another proof, and statements that logically follow from previous statements in the sequence, and which concludes with a statement that is the object of the proof.
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(countable, mathematics) A process for testing the accuracy of an operation performed. Compare prove, transitive verb, 5.
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(US) A measure of the alcohol content of liquor. Originally, in Britain, 100 proof was defined as 57.1% by volume (not used anymore). In the US, 100 proof means that the alcohol content is 50% of the total volume of the liquid, and thus, absolute alcohol would be 200 proof.
noun
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Used in proving or testing.

A proof load; a proof charge.

adjective
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Firm or successful in resisting.

Proof against harm.

Waterproof; bombproof.

adjective
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(of alcoholic liquors) Being of a certain standard as to alcohol content.
adjective
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(intransitive, colloquial) To proofread.
verb
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To make resistant, especially to water.
verb
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To knead, as in bread dough.
verb
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Used to form adjectives denoting an impervious or impenetrable quality.
suffix
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Proof is evidence or argument that forces someone to believe something as true.

An example of proof is someone returning to eat at the same restaurant many times showing they enjoy the food.

noun
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The evidence or argument that compels the mind to accept an assertion as true.
noun
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Proven impenetrability.
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Origin of proof

  • From Webster's New World College Dictionary, 5th Edition

  • Middle English prove, preve from Anglo-Norman prove and from Old French prueve both from Late Latin proba from Latin probāre to prove prove

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English proof, from Old French prove, from Late Latin proba (“a proof"), from Latin probare (“to prove"); see prove.

    From Wiktionary