Pull meaning

po͝ol
To apply force to (something) so as to cause or tend to cause motion toward the source of the force.

Pulled her chair up to the table; pulled the wagon down the street.

verb
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2
To remove from a fixed position; extract.

The dentist pulled the tooth.

verb
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1
To tug at; jerk or tweak.

I pulled the lever until it broke.

verb
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To rip or tear; rend.

The dog pulled the toy to pieces.

verb
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To drink or inhale deeply.

Pulled on the cold beer with gusto; pull on a cigarette.

verb
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(slang) To draw out (a weapon) in readiness for use.

Pull a gun; pulled a knife on me.

verb
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To exert force in moving something toward the source of the force.

Pull harder and the window will open.

verb
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(nautical) To row a boat.
verb
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(informal) To express or feel great sympathy or empathy.

We're pulling for our new president.

verb
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The act or process of pulling.

Gave the drawer a pull.

noun
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Force exerted in pulling or required to overcome resistance in pulling.

How much pull does this tugboat have?

noun
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A sustained effort.

A long pull across the mountains.

noun
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Something, such as a knob on a drawer, that is used for pulling.
noun
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A deep inhalation or draft, as on a cigarette or of a beverage.
noun
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(slang) A means of gaining special advantage; influence.

The lobbyist has pull with the senator.

noun
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(informal) The ability to draw or attract; appeal.

A star with pull at the box office.

noun
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To exert force or influence on so as to cause to move toward or after the source of the force; drag, tug, draw, attract, etc.
verb
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To draw apart; rip; tear.

To pull a seam.

verb
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To shred (cooked meat) and serve, typically, with a sauce.

A pulled pork sandwich.

verb
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To stretch (taffy, etc.) back and forth repeatedly.
verb
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To stretch or strain to the point of injury.

To pull a muscle.

verb
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To select, access, or withdraw (a file, form, etc.)

To pull a patient's medical records.

verb
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(informal) To put into effect; carry out; perform.

To pull a raid.

verb
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(informal) To hold back; restrain.

To pull one's punches.

verb
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(informal) To take (a gun, knife, etc.) from concealment, as to threaten someone.

The robber pulled a gun on the bank teller.

verb
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(dial.) To draw the entrails from (a fowl)
verb
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(baseball, golf) To hit (the ball) and make it go to the left or, if left-handed, to the right.
verb
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(horse racing) To rein in or restrain (a horse) so as to keep it from winning.
verb
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(printing) To take (a proof) on a hand press.
verb
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To exert force in or for dragging, tugging, or attracting something.
verb
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To take a deep draft of a drink or puff at a cigarette, etc.
verb
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To be capable of being pulled.
verb
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To move or drive a vehicle (away, ahead, around, out, etc.)
verb
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(football) To run behind, and parallel to, the line of scrimmage, as to provide blocking for a ballcarrier.
verb
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To stretch (taffy, for example) repeatedly.
verb
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To strain (a muscle, for example) injuriously.
verb
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(informal) To attract; draw.

A performer who pulls large crowds.

verb
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(informal) To remove.

Pulled the car's engine; pulled the tainted meat product from the stores.

verb
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(sports) To hit (a ball) so that it moves in the direction away from the dominant hand of the player propelling it, as to the left of a right-handed player.
verb
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To rein in (a horse) to keep it from winning a race.
verb
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(printing) To produce (a print or an impression) from type.
verb
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The act, force, or result of pulling.
  • A dragging, tugging, attracting, etc.
  • The act or an instance of rowing.
  • A drink.
  • A puff at a cigarette, etc.
  • A difficult, continuous effort, as in climbing.
  • The force needed to move a weight, trigger, etc., measured in pounds.
noun
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1
In the World Wide Web, a technology that requires that the user initiate access to a Web site to download content. See also push and World Wide Web.
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To apply a force to (an object) so that it comes toward the person or thing applying the force.
verb
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1
To gather with the hand, or by drawing toward oneself; to pluck.

To pull fruit from a tree; to pull flax; to pull a finch.

verb
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(intransitive) To apply a force such that an object comes toward the person or thing applying the force.

You're going to have to pull harder to get that cork out of the bottle.

verb
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To draw apart; to tear; to rend.
verb
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(intransitive, UK, Ireland, slang) To persuade (someone) to have sex with one.

I pulled at the club last night.

He's pulled that bird over there.

verb
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To remove (something), especially from public circulation or availability.

Each day, they pulled the old bread and set out fresh loaves.

verb
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(informal) To do or perform.

He regularly pulls 12-hour days, sometimes 14.

You'll be sent home if you pull another stunt like that.

verb
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To retrieve or generate for use.

I'll have to pull a part number for that.

verb
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To toss a frisbee with the intention of launching the disc across the length of a field.
verb
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(intransitive) To row.
verb
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To strain (a muscle, tendon, ligament, etc.).
verb
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(video games, intransitive) To draw (a hostile non-player character) into combat, or toward or away from some location or target.
verb
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To score a certain amount of points in a sport.
verb
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(horse-racing) To hold back, and so prevent from winning.

The favourite was pulled.

verb
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(printing, dated) To take or make (a proof or impression); so called because hand presses were worked by pulling a lever.
verb
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(cricket) To strike the ball in a particular manner. (See noun sense.)
verb
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Something to be pulled, as the handle of a drawer, etc.
noun
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2
(UK, slang) To pour beer from a pump, keg, or other source.

Let's stop at Finnigan's. The barkeep pulls a good pint.

verb
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2
An act of pulling (applying force)

He gave the hair a sharp pull and it came out.

noun
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An attractive force which causes motion towards the source.

The spaceship came under the pull of the gas giant.

Iron fillings drawn by the pull of a magnet.

She took a pull on her cigarette.

noun
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Any device meant to be pulled, as a lever, knob, handle, or rope.

A zipper pull.

noun
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(slang, dated) Something in one's favour in a comparison or a contest; an advantage; means of influencing.

In weights the favourite had the pull.

noun
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Appeal or attraction (as of a movie star)
noun
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(Internet, uncountable) The situation where a client sends out a request for data from a server, as in server pull, pull technology.
noun
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A journey made by rowing.
noun
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(dated) A contest; a struggle.

A wrestling pull.

noun
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(slang) The act of drinking.

To take a pull at a mug of beer.

noun
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(cricket) A kind of stroke by which a leg ball is sent to the off side, or an off ball to the side.
noun
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(act of pulling): push, shove.
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(attractive force): repulsion.
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(device meant to be pulled): button, push, push button.
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(influence).
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To pull is defined as to make something move toward something else by tugging or dragging.

An example of pull is hitching a trailer to a car and moving it down the street.

An example of pull is someone bringing a door toward themselves to open it.

verb
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(informal) pull a fast one
  • To play a trick or perpetrate a fraud.
idiom
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pull (oneself) together
  • To regain one's composure.
idiom
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pull (one's) punches
  • To refrain from deploying all the resources or force at one's disposal:
    Didn't pull any punches during the negotiations.
idiom
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pull (one's) weight
  • To do one's own share, as of work.
idiom
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(informal) pull out all the stops
  • To deploy all the resources or force at one's disposal:
    The Inaugural Committee pulled out all the stops when arranging the ceremonies.
idiom
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pull (someone's) leg
  • To play a joke on; tease or deceive.
idiom
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pull something
  • To carry out a deception or swindle:
    Worried that his partners might be trying to pull something behind his back.
idiom
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(informal) pull strings
  • To exert secret control or influence in order to gain an end.
idiom
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(slang) pull the plug on
  • To stop supporting or bring to an end:
    Pulled the plug on the new art courses.
idiom
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(informal) pull the rug (out) from under
  • To remove all support and assistance from, usually suddenly.
idiom
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pull the string
  • To throw an off-speed pitch.
idiom
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pull the wool over (someone's) eyes
  • To deceive; hoodwink.
idiom
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pull together
  • To make a joint effort.
idiom
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pull up stakes
  • To clear out; leave:
    She pulled up stakes in New England and moved to the desert.
idiom
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(idiom) pull a face
idiom
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pull apart
  • to find fault with; criticize
idiom
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pull down
  • to tear down, demolish, or overthrow
  • to degrade; humble
  • to reduce
  • to get (a specified wage, grade, etc.)
idiom
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(informal) pull for
  • to cheer on, or hope for the success of
idiom
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pull in
  • to arrive
  • to draw in or hold back
  • to arrest and take to police headquarters
idiom
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pull off
  • to bring about, accomplish, or perform
idiom
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pull out
  • to depart
  • to withdraw or retreat
  • to escape from a contract, responsibility, etc.
  • to level out from a dive or landing approach
idiom
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pull over
  • to drive (a vehicle) to or toward the curb or shoulder and come to a stop
  • to induce (someone), as by signaling, to do this
idiom
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pull through
  • to get through or over (an illness, difficulty, etc.)
idiom
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pull oneself together
  • to collect one's faculties; regain one's composure, courage, etc.
idiom
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pull up
  • to uproot
  • to bring or come to a stop
  • to check or rebuke
idiom
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Origin of pull

  • Middle English pullen from Old English pullian

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English pullen, from Old English pullian (“to pull, draw, tug, pluck off"). Related to Middle Dutch pullen (“to drink"), Low German pulen (“to pick, pluck, pull, tear, strip off husks"), Icelandic púla (“to work hard, beat").

    From Wiktionary