Force meaning

fôrs
The definition of force is strength or power.

An example of force is someone using their hand to push open a door.

An example of force is a police man pointing a gun at an armed person in order to get them to drop their weapon.

noun
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The capacity to do work or cause physical change; energy, strength, or active power.

The force of an explosion.

noun
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Any group of people organized for some activity.

A sales force, a police force.

noun
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Force is defined as to make someone or something do something.

An example of force is using strength to open a jar.

verb
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(botany) To cause to grow or mature by artificially accelerating normal processes.
verb
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The power of a person to act effectively and vigorously; moral or intellectual strength.

Force of character.

noun
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To exert beyond the natural limits or capacity; strain.

To force one's voice.

verb
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. Force used which is known or expected, or should be expected to cause death.
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(archaic) To provide with forces; to reinforce; to strengthen by soldiers; to man; to garrison.

verb
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To cause (plants, fruit, etc.) to develop or grow faster by artificial means.
verb
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To cause to do something by or as if by force; compel.
verb
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To get or take by force; wrest; extort.

Forcing the gun from his hand.

verb
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To drive by or as by force; cause to move against resistance; impel.

To force an article into a filled box.

verb
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To impose by or as by force.

To force one's attentions on another.

verb
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To effect or produce by or as by force; produce by unusual or unnatural effort.

To force a smile.

verb
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Any of various factors that cause a body to change its speed, direction, or shape. Force is a vector quantity, having both magnitude and direction. Contributions of force from different sources can be summed to give the net force at any given point.
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Strength; energy; vigor; power.
noun
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(law) Binding power; validity.
noun
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(physics) The cause, or agent, that puts an object at rest into motion or alters the motion of a moving object.
noun
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To rape (a woman)
verb
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To violate (a woman); to rape. [from 14th c.]
verb
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To rape.
verb
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Any of the four natural phenomena involving the interaction between particles of matter. From the strongest to the weakest, the four forces are the strong nuclear force , the electromagnetic force , the weak nuclear force , and gravity .
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An earlier dBASE compiler developed by Sophco, Inc., Boulder, CO, which combined C and dBASE structures. It was noted for generating very small executable programs.
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Power or strength.
noun
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. Legal validity, as with a law or regulation that is “in force.”
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Strength or energy of body or mind; active power; vigour; might; capacity of exercising an influence or producing an effect.

The force of an appeal, an argument, or a contract.

noun
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Power exerted against will or consent; compulsory power; violence; coercion.
noun
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(countable) Anything that is able to make a big change in a person or thing.
noun
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(countable, physics) A physical quantity that denotes ability to push, pull, twist or accelerate a body which is measured in a unit dimensioned in mass × distance/time² (ML/T²): SI: newton (N); CGS: dyne (dyn)
noun
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Something or anything that has the power to produce an effect upon something else.
noun
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(countable) A group that aims to attack, control, or constrain.

Police force.

noun
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​(uncountable) The ability to attack, control, or constrain.

Show of force.

noun
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(countable) A magic trick in which the outcome is known to the magician beforehand, especially one involving the apparent free choice of a card by another person.
noun
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(law) Legal validity.

The law will come into force in January.

noun
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(law) Either unlawful violence, as in a "forced entry", or lawful compulsion.
noun
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To compel (someone or something) to do something. [from 15th c.]
verb
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To constrain by force; to overcome the limitations or resistance of. [from 16th c.]
verb
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To drive (something) by force, to propel (generally + prepositional phrase or adverb). [from 16th c.]
verb
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To cause to occur (despite inertia, resistance etc.); to produce through force. [from 16th c.]

The comedian's jokes weren't funny, but I forced a laugh now and then.

verb
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To forcibly open (a door, lock etc.). [from 17th c.]

To force a lock.

verb
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To obtain or win by strength; to take by violence or struggle; specifically, to capture by assault; to storm, as a fortress.
verb
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(baseball) To create an out by touching a base in advance of a runner who has no base to return to while in possession of a ball which has already touched the ground.

Jones forced the runner at second by stepping on the bag.

verb
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(whist) To compel (an adversary or partner) to trump a trick by leading a suit that he/she does not hold.
verb
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(archaic) To put in force; to cause to be executed; to make binding; to enforce.
verb
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(countable, Northern England) A waterfall or cascade.
noun
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To stuff; to lard; to farce.
verb
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(Northern England) Falls. used in place names.
pronoun
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(baseball) A force play.
noun
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1
To compel through pressure or necessity.

I forced myself to practice daily. He was forced to take a second job.

verb
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To induce change in (a complex system) by changing one of its parameters.

Greenhouse gases that force the earth's climate.

verb
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(games) To cause an opponent to play (a particular card).
verb
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The intensity of power; impetus.

The force of a blow.

noun
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The real or precise meaning; basic point.

To miss the force of something said.

noun
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force (oneself) on
  • To rape.
idiom
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force (someone's) hand
  • To force to act or speak prematurely or unwillingly.
idiom
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in force
  • In full strength; in large numbers:
    Demonstrators were out in force.
  • In effect; operative:
    A rule that is no longer in force.
idiom
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in force
  • in full strength; in full number
  • in effect; operative; valid
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of force

  • Middle English from Old French from Medieval Latin fortia from neuter pl. of Latin fortis strong bhergh-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English force, fors, forse, from Old French force, from Late Latin fortia, from neuter plural of Latin fortis (“strong”).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Old Norse fors (“waterfall”). Cognate with Swedish fors (“waterfall”)

    From Wiktionary

  • From Old Norse fors or foss (“waterfall”)

    From Wiktionary

  • See farce (“to stuff”).

    From Wiktionary