Farce definition

färs
An exaggerated comedy based on broadly humorous, highly unlikely situations.
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The definition of a farce is something that is intended to be seen as ridiculous, particularly a comedy based on an unlikely situation.

An example of farce is the show "The Three Stooges."

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A seasoned stuffing, as for roasted turkey.
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A light dramatic work in which highly improbable plot situations, exaggerated characters, and often slapstick elements are used for humorous effect.
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The branch of literature constituting such works.
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The broad or spirited humor characteristic of such works.
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(now rare) Stuffing, as for a fowl.
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To fill out with or as with stuffing or seasoning.

To farce a play with old jokes.

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(uncountable) A style of humor marked by broad improbabilities with little regard to regularity or method; compare sarcasm.
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(countable) A motion picture or play featuring this style of humor.

The farce that we saw last night had us laughing and shaking our heads at the same time.

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(uncountable) A situation abounding with ludicrous incidents.

The first month of labor negotiations was a farce.

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(uncountable) A ridiculous or empty show.

The political arena is a mere farce, with all sorts of fools trying to grab power.

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To stuff with forcemeat.
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(figuratively) To fill full; to stuff.
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A ludicrous, empty show; a mockery.

The fixed election was a farce.

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To pad (a speech, for example) with jokes or witticisms.
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To stuff, as for roasting.
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Broad humor of the kind found in such plays.
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Something absurd or ridiculous, as an obvious pretense.

His show of grief was a farce.

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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
farce
Plural:
farces

Origin of farce

  • Middle English farse stuffing from Old French farce stuffing, interpolation, interlude from Vulgar Latin farsa from feminine of Latin farsus variant of fartus past participle of farcīre to stuff

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English farcen, from Old French farsir, farcir, from Latin farcire (“to cram, stuff”).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle French farce (“comic interlude in a mystery play”).

    From Wiktionary