Tragedy definition

trăjĭ-dē
Frequency:
A novel or other literary work with similar characteristics.
noun
13
4
A disastrous event, especially one involving distressing loss or injury to life.

An expedition that ended in tragedy, with all hands lost at sea.

noun
10
3
The tragic element of such a literary work, or of a real event.
noun
8
3
The genre of such works, and the art of producing them.
noun
4
2
A tragic aspect or element.
noun
1
0
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A drama or literary work in which the main character is brought to ruin or suffers extreme sorrow, especially as a consequence of a tragic flaw, moral weakness, or inability to cope with unfavorable circumstances.
noun
1
0
The genre made up of such works.
noun
1
0
The art or theory of writing or producing these works.
noun
1
0
A very sad or tragic event or sequence of events; disaster.
noun
1
0
A serious play or drama typically dealing with the problems of a central character, leading to an unhappy or disastrous ending brought on, as in ancient drama, by fate and a tragic flaw in this character, or, in modern drama, usually by moral weakness, psychological maladjustment, or social pressures.
noun
1
0
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Such plays collectively.
noun
1
0
The branch of drama having to do with such plays.
noun
1
0
A drama or similar work, in which the main character is brought to ruin or otherwise suffers the extreme consequences of some tragic flaw or weakness of character.
noun
1
0
A disastrous event, especially one involving great loss of life or injury.
noun
1
0
Tragedy is defined as something very bad that happens.

An example of tragedy is when a child dies in a fire.

noun
2
2
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The writing, acting, or theoretical principles of this kind of drama.
noun
2
2
A play, film, television program, or other narrative work that portrays or depicts calamitous events and has an unhappy but meaningful ending.
noun
1
2

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
tragedy
Plural:
tragedies

Origin of tragedy

  • Middle English tragedie from Old French from Latin tragoedia from Greek tragōidiā tragos goat aoidē, ōidē song wed-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From the Middle English tragedie, from the Old French tragedie, from the Latin tragoedia, from the Ancient Greek τραγῳδία (tragōidia, “epic play, tragedy"), from τράγος (tragos, “male goat") + ᾠδή (ōidÄ“, “song"), a reference to the goat-satyrs of the theatrical plays of the Dorians.

    From Wiktionary