Struggle meaning

strŭgəl
Struggle is defined as to do something with difficulty.

An example of struggle is carrying a heavy load uphill for a long distance.

verb
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0
To exert muscular energy, as against a material force or mass.

Struggled with the heavy load.

verb
6
1
To move or place (something) with an effort.

Struggled the heavy desk into the elevator.

verb
4
1
To make one's way with difficulty.

To struggle through a thicket.

verb
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To bring, put, do, etc. by struggling.
verb
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To make (one's way) with difficulty.
verb
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Great effort or a series of efforts; violent exertion.
noun
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Conflict; strife; contention.
noun
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To contend or fight violently with an opponent.
verb
2
1
To make great efforts or attempts; strive; labor.
verb
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1
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noun
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To strive, or to make efforts, with a twisting, or with contortions of the body.

She struggled to escape from her assailant's grasp.

verb
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To contend or compete.
verb
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The act of struggling.

The rat's struggle to escape the snake's coils.

noun
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A strenuous effort in the face of difficulty.

The struggle for civil rights.

noun
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Strife, contention, or combat.

Armed struggle.

noun
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Something that is difficult to do or achieve.

Getting him to agree will be a struggle.

noun
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To strive, to labour in difficulty, to fight (for or against), to contend.

During the centuries, the people of Ireland struggled constantly to assert their right to govern themselves.

verb
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Origin of struggle

  • Middle English struglen

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English struglen, stroglen, strogelen, of obscure origin. Cognate with Scots strugil (“to struggle, grapple, contend"). Perhaps from a variant of *strokelen, *stroukelen (> English stroll), from Middle Dutch struyckelen ("to stumble, trip, falter"; > Modern Dutch struikelen), the frequentative form of Old Dutch *strÅ«kon (“to stumble"), from Proto-Germanic *strÅ«kōnÄ…, *strÅ«kÄ“nÄ… (“to be stiff"), from Proto-Indo-European *strug-, *ster- (“to be stiff; to bristle, strut, stumble, fall"), related to Middle Low German strûkelen ("to stumble"; > Low German strükeln), Old High German strÅ«hhÄ“n, strÅ«hhōn ("to stumble, trip, tumble, go astray"; > Modern German strauchen, straucheln).

    From Wiktionary

  • Alternative etymology derives the base of struggle from Old Norse strúgr (“arrogance, pride, spitefulness, ill-will"), from Proto-Germanic *strÅ«kaz (“stiff, rigid"), ultimately from the same Proto-Indo-European root above, which would make it cognate with Swedish dialectal strug (“contention, strife, discord"), Norwegian stru (“obstinate, unruly"), Danish struende (“reluctantly"), Scots strug (“difficulty, perplexity, a laborious task").

    From Wiktionary