Yield meaning

yēld
To give way to physical force.

The gate would not yield to their blows.

verb
8
3
To give place; lose precedence, leadership, etc.
  • To let another, esp. a motorist, have the right of way.
  • To give up willingly a right, position, privilege, etc.
verb
6
3
To pay; recompense.
verb
4
3
To give up; surrender; submit.
verb
4
3
The return that is earned on an investment. For example, a bond that pays 7 percent interest yields 7 percent, which also may be called the nominal yield. Current yield, however, gives the actual interest rate that will be earned. To obtain current yield, divide the amount of interest earned annually, using the bond’s interest rate, by the purchase price. In contrast, the yield to maturity is the effective interest rate that is earned if the bond is held until it matures.
3
2
Advertisement
The definition of a yield is the act of producing or the amount produced.

An example of yield is the total earnings from an investment.

An example of yield is the interest rate earned on an investment.

noun
3
4
To let go of or forego something.
noun
2
1
Gareth and Lynette, Tennyson.

The good mother holds me still a child! Good mother is bad mother unto me! A worse were better; yet no worse would I. Heaven yield her for it!

verb
2
1
Shakespeare.

Tend me to-night two hours, I ask no more, / And the gods yield you for 't.

verb
2
1
To give way; to allow another to pass first.

Yield the right of way to pedestrians.

verb
2
1
Advertisement
To give; concede; grant.

To yield the right of way, to yield a point.

verb
2
2
(1) In semiconductor manufacturing, the percentage of chips in a finished wafer that pass all tests and function properly.
2
2
To give up under pressure; surrender.

To yield oneself up to pleasure.

verb
2
5
To produce or bear.

A mine that has yielded poorly.

verb
2
5
Beaumont and Fletcher.

God yield thee, and God thank ye.

verb
1
1
Advertisement
To furnish; to afford; to render; to give forth.
verb
1
1
To give as required; to surrender, relinquish or capitulate.

They refuse to yield to the enemy.

verb
1
1
(intransitive) To give way; to succumb to a force.
verb
1
1
To produce as return, as from an investment.

Historically, that security yields a high return.

verb
1
1
(mathematics) To produce as a result.

Adding 3 and 4 yields a result of 7.

verb
1
1
Advertisement
(engineering, materials science, of a material specimen) To pass the material's yield point and undergo plastic deformation.
verb
1
1
A product; the quantity of something produced.

Zucchini plants always seem to produce a high yield of fruit.

noun
1
1
(law) The current return as a percentage of the price of a stock or bond.
noun
1
1
The amount yielded or produced; return on labor, investment, taxes, etc.; product.
noun
1
2
The ratio of the annual cash dividends or of the earnings per share of a stock to the market price.
noun
1
2
Advertisement
The monetary return from an investment.
noun
1
2
The energy released by an explosion, especially by a nuclear explosion, expressed in units of weight (usually kilotons) of TNT required to produce an equivalent release.
noun
0
0
Yield is defined as to produce or give something to another.

An example of yield is an orchard producing a lot of fruit.

An example of yield is giving someone the right of way while driving.

verb
0
1
To produce.
  • To give or furnish as a natural process or as the result of cultivation.
    An orchard that yielded a good crop.
  • To give in return; produce as a result, profit, etc.
    An investment that yielded high profits.
verb
0
1
The act of yielding, or producing.
noun
0
1
Advertisement

Origin of yield

  • Middle English yielden from Old English geldan to pay

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English yielden, yelden (“to yield, pay"), from Old English Ä¡ieldan (“to pay"), from Proto-Germanic *geldanÄ… (“to pay"), from Proto-Indo-European *gÊ°eldÊ°- (“to pay"). Cognate with Scots yield (“to yield"), North Frisian jilden (“to pay"), West Frisian jilde (“to pay"), Dutch gelden (“to apply, be count or valued"), German gelten (“to have worth or value, be valid, count"), Icelandic gjalda (“to pay, yield, give").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English ȝeld, from Old English Ä¡ield, from Proto-Germanic *geldÄ… (“reward, gift, money"), from Proto-Indo-European *gÊ°eldÊ°- (“to pay"). Compare West Frisian jild, Dutch geld, Low German and German Geld, Danish gjæld, Swedish gäld, Icelandic gjald. See also geld.

    From Wiktionary