Take definition

tāk
To affect in a strong or sudden manner as if by capturing, as:
  • To deal a blow to; strike or hit.
    The boxer took his opponent a sharp jab to the ribs.
  • To delight or captivate.
    She was taken by the puppy.
  • To catch or affect with a particular action.
    Your remark took me by surprise.
verb
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To get benefit from by exposure to (the air, sun, etc.)
verb
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To have sexual intercourse with.
verb
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To make use of or select for use, as:
  • To move into or assume occupancy of.
    She took a seat by the fireplace. The team took the field.
  • To choose for one's own use; avail oneself of the use of.
    We took a room in the cheaper hotel.
  • To require the use of (something).
    It takes money to live in this town. This camera takes 35-millimeter film.
  • To use or require (time).
    It only takes a few minutes to wash the car.
  • To use (something) as a means of conveyance or transportation.
    Take a train to Pittsburgh.
  • To use (something) as a means of safety or refuge.
    Take shelter from the storm.
  • To choose and then adopt (a particular route or direction) while on foot or while operating a vehicle.
    Take a right at the next corner. I downshifted to take the corner.
verb
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To understand or interpret.

May I take your smile as an indication of approval?

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To accept, receive, or assume, as:
  • To accept (something owed, offered, or given) either reluctantly or willingly.
    Take a bribe.
  • To allow to come in; give access or admission to; admit.
    The boat took a lot of water but remained afloat.
  • To provide room for; accommodate.
    We can't take more than 100 guests.
  • To become saturated or impregnated with (dye, for example).
  • To submit to (something inflicted); undergo or suffer.
    Didn't take his punishment well.
  • To put up with; endure or tolerate.
    I've had about all I can take from them.
  • To receive into a particular relation or association, as into one's care or keeping.
    They plan to take a new partner into the firm. We took the dog for a week.
  • To assume for oneself.
    Take all the credit.
  • To agree to undertake or engage in (a task or duty, for example).
    She took the position of chair of the committee.
  • (baseball) To refrain from swinging at (a pitched ball).
  • To be affected with; catch.
    The child took the flu.
  • To be hit or penetrated by.
    Took a lot of punches; took a bullet in the leg.
  • To withstand.
    The dam took the heavy flood waters.
  • To require or have as a fitting or proper accompaniment.
    Transitive verbs take a direct object.
verb
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To get by conquering; capture; seize.
verb
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To trap, snare, or catch (a bird, animal, or fish)
verb
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To get hold of; grasp or catch.
verb
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To hit (a person) in or on some part.
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To affect; attack.

Taken with a fit.

verb
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To catch in some act, esp. a moral fault.

Taken in adultery.

verb
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To capture the fancy of; charm.
verb
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To get into one's hand or hold; transfer to oneself.
verb
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To eat, drink, swallow, etc. for nourishment or as medicine.
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To admit; let in.

The bus takes 20 riders.

verb
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To enter into a special relationship with.

To take a wife.

verb
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To buy.

He took the first suit he tried on.

verb
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To rent, lease, or pay for so as to occupy or use.

To take a cottage.

verb
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To get regularly by paying for.

To take a daily newspaper.

verb
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To assume as a responsibility, task, etc.

To take a job.

verb
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To assume or adopt (a symbol of duty or office)

The president took the chair.

verb
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To obligate oneself by.

To take a vow.

verb
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To join or associate oneself with (one party or side in a contest, disagreement, etc.)
verb
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To assume as if granted or due one.

To take the blame, to take deductions.

verb
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(informal) To swindle, defraud, or cheat.

You've really been taken.

verb
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To carry in one's possession.

Don't forget to take your umbrella.

verb
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To convey by transportation.

This bus will take you to Dallas.

verb
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To lead or cause to go along to another place.

The guide took us to the waterfall.

verb
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To be as a path or course for; provide a way for.

The trail takes you to the lake.

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To undertake, make, or perform.

Take a walk; take a decision.

verb
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To perceive or become aware of by one of the senses.

Took a quick look at the sky; took a smell of the spices.

verb
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To commit and apply oneself to the study of.

Take art lessons; take Spanish.

verb
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To study for with success.

Took a degree in law.

verb
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To accept as true; believe.

I'll take your word that he's telling the truth.

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To impose upon oneself; subject oneself to.

Take a vow.

verb
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To follow or adhere to (advice or a suggestion, for example).
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To accept or adopt as one's own.

Take a stand on an issue; take an interest in local history.

verb
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To regard or consider in a particular relation or from a particular viewpoint.

We must take the bitter with the sweet. Take the matter as settled.

verb
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To consider to be equal to; reckon.

We take their number at 1,000.

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To perceive or feel; experience.

I took a dislike to my neighbor's intrusions.

verb
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To obtain from a source; derive or draw.

This book takes its title from the Bible.

verb
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To obtain, as through measurement or a specified procedure.

Took the patient's temperature.

verb
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To write or make a record of, especially in shorthand or cursive writing.

Take a letter; take notes.

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To create (an image, likeness, or representation), as by photography.

Took a picture of us.

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To include or distribute (a charge) in a financial record.
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To become.

He took sick.

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To get something into one's possession; acquire possession.

The invaders took and took, until they had everything.

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To accept or receive something.

When it comes to advice, you take but you never give.

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To have the intended effect; operate or work.

The skin graft took.

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To start growing; root or germinate.

Have the seeds taken?

verb
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To engage or mesh; catch, as gears or other mechanical parts.
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To gain popularity or favor.

The television series never took and was later canceled.

verb
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(regional) To begin or engage in an activity.

He took and threw the money in the river.

verb
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A quantity collected at one time, especially the amount of profit or receipts taken on a business venture or from ticket sales at a sporting event.
noun
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The number of fish, game birds, or other animals killed or captured at one time.
noun
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A scene filmed without interrupting the run of the camera.
noun
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A recording made in a single session.
noun
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A physical reaction, such as a rash, indicating a successful vaccination.
noun
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A successful graft.
noun
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An attempt or a try.

He got the answer on the third take.

noun
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An interpretation or assessment, as of an event.

The mayor was asked for her take on the judge's decision.

noun
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To accept (something offered)

To take a bet, to take advice.

verb
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To carry or transport.

To take a book with one.

verb
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To remove from a person, thing, or place; specif., to steal.
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To remove by death; bring to an end.

Cancer takes many lives.

verb
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To subtract.

To take two from ten.

verb
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To direct or move (oneself)
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To win (a game, a trick at cards, etc.)
verb
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To capture (an opponent's piece in chess or checkers)
verb
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To travel by.

To take a bus.

verb
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To set out on; follow.

To take the old path.

verb
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To occupy.

Take a chair.

verb
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To use up; consume.

To take all day.

verb
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To make (a photograph, picture, etc.)
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To draw, photograph, etc. a likeness of.

Take the scene in color.

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To understand the remarks of (a person)
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To comprehend the meaning of (words or remarks)
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To understand or interpret in a specified way.
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(informal) Opinion; evaluation; assessment.

What's your take on the new tax?

noun
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(printing) The amount of copy sent to the compositor at one time.
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The amount or quantity of something taken.

The day's take of fish.

noun
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(slang) Money received; receipts or profit.
noun
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The process of photographing such a shot.
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Any of a series of recordings or tapes of a performance, from which one will be made for release to the public.
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The process of so recording.
noun
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To require or limit.
  • To support or carry without failing or breaking.
    That truck bed will only take two tons.
  • Looks like it's gonna take a taller person to get that down. Finishing this on schedule will take a lot of overtime.
  • To last or expend [an amount of time].
    I estimate the trip will take about ten minutes.
verb
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(sports) To decide or to act.
  • (baseball) To not swing at a pitch.
    He'll probably take this one.
  • (climbing) To tighten (take up) a belaying rope. Often used imperatively.
  • (cricket) To catch the ball; especially for the wicket-keeper to catch the ball after the batsman has missed or edged it.
  • To be the player who performs (a free kick, etc.).
    The kick is taken from where the foul occurred. Pirès ran in to take the kick. The throw-in is taken from the point where the ball crossed the touch-line.
  • Not to refuse or balk at; to undertake readily; to clear.
    The pony took every hedge and fence in its path.
verb
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To have sex with.

The rapist took his victims in dark alleys.

verb
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To fight or attempt to fight somebody. (See also take on.)

Don't try to take that guy. He's bigger than you.

verb
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(intransitive) To stick, persist, thrive or remain.

I started some tomato seeds last spring, but they didn't take.

He was inoculated, but the virus did not take.

verb
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To use.

Let's take the bus today. This camera takes 35mm film.

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I've had a lot of problems recently. Take last Monday. The car broke down on the way to work. Then ...etc.

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To gain or secure the interest or affection of; to captivate; to engage; to interest; to charm.
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To bear without ill humour or resentment; to submit to; to tolerate; to endure.

Can he take a joke?

I'm not going to take your insults.

verb
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To accept the word or offer of; to receive and accept.
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To draw; to deduce; to derive.

I'm not sure what moral to take from that story.

verb
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To accept, as something offered; to receive; not to refuse or reject; to admit.
verb
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(often with to mean) To understand or interpret.
verb
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An act of taking.
noun
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Something that is taken; a haul.
noun
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A profit, reward, bribe, illegal payoff or unethical kickback.

He wants half of the take if he helps with the job.

The mayor is on the take.

noun
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What's your take on this issue, Fred?

noun
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(film) An attempt to record a scene.

It's a take.

Act seven, scene three, take two.

noun
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(rugby) A catch.
noun
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(acting) A facial gesture in response to an event.

I did a take when I saw the new car in the driveway.

noun
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(cricket) A catch of the ball, especially by the wicket-keeper.
noun
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(printing) The quantity or copy given to a compositor at one time.
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To get into one's hands, control, or possession, especially:
  • To grasp or grip.
    Take your partner's hand.
  • To capture physically; seize.
    Take an enemy fortress.
  • To seize with authority or legal right.
    The town took the land by eminent domain.
  • To get possession of (fish or game, for example) by capturing or killing.
  • (sports) To catch or receive (a ball or puck).
    The player took the pass on the fly.
  • (sports & games) To acquire in a game or competition; win.
    Took the crown in horse racing.
  • (sports & games) To defeat.
    Our team took the visitors three to one.
  • To engage in sex with.
verb
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To receive into or on the body, as:
  • To put (food or drink, for example) into the body; eat or drink.
    Took a little soup for dinner.
  • To draw in; inhale.
    Took a deep breath.
  • To expose one's body to (healthful or pleasurable treatment, for example).
    Take the sun; take the waters at a spa.
verb
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Take is defined as capture, get hold of, transfer something to oneself or travel by something.

An example of take is making a photograph of a friend.

An example of take is having a drink of water from a cup.

An example of take is having a ride in a taxi to the airport.

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To remove or cause to be absent, especially:
  • To remove with the hands or an instrument.
    I took the dishes from the sink. The dentist took two molars.
  • To cause to die; kill or destroy.
    The blight took these tomatoes.
  • To subtract.
    If you take 10 from 30, you get 20.
  • To exact.
    The storm took its toll.
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(slang) To cheat; trick.
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(gram.) To have or admit of according to usage, nature, etc.; be used with in construction.

A transitive verb takes an object.

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To choose; select.
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To use or employ; resort to.

To take a mop to the floor.

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To go to (a place) for shelter, safety, etc.

To take cover.

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To deal with; consider.

To take a matter seriously.

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To require; demand; need.

It takes money; to take a size ten.

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(baseball) To allow (a pitched ball) to pass without swinging one's bat.
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To have a specified reaction to.

To take a joke in earnest.

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To confront and get over, through, etc.

The horse took the jump.

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To be affected by (a disease, etc.)

To take cold.

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To absorb; become impregnated or treated with (a dye, polish, etc.)
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To suppose; presume.

He took her to be a teacher.

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To have or feel (an emotion or mental state)

Take pity, take notice.

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To hold and act upon (an idea, point of view, etc.)
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To do; perform (an act)

To take a walk.

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To make or put forth (a resolution or objection) as the result of thought.
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(informal) To aim and execute (a specified action) at an object.

To take a jab at someone.

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To be the way or means of going to (a place, condition, etc.); conduct; lead.

The path takes you to the river.

verb
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To escort or accompany.

To take a friend to dinner.

verb
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To get possession.
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To hook or engage with another part.
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To take root; begin growing.
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To lay hold; catch.

The fire took rapidly.

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To gain public favor; be popular.
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To be effective in action, operation, desired result, etc.

The vaccination took; the dye takes well.

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To remove a part; detract (from)

Nothing took from the scene's beauty.

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To be made or adapted to be taken (up, down, apart, etc.)
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(informal) To be photographed in a specified way.

She takes well in profile.

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(law) To take possession of property.
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The act or process of taking.
noun
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Something that has been taken.
noun
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A vaccination that takes.
noun
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An uninterrupted shot photographed by a camera.
noun
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To get or put something into one's or someone's possession or control.
  • To grasp with the hands.
  • To pick up and move to oneself.
    I'll take that plate off the table.
  • To carry or move, especially to a particular destination.
    I'll take the plate with me.
  • To lead; to conduct.
    Who's going to take the kids to school?.
    I took my girlfriend to the cinema.
  • To choose.
    I'll take the blue plates.
    We took the road on the right.
  • To accept.
    Do you take sugar in your coffee?.
    We take all major credit cards.
  • (military) To gain a position by force.
    After a bloody battle, they were able to take the city.
  • I take aspirin every day to thin my blood.
  • The photographer took a picture of our family.
  • (dated) To form a likeness of; to copy; to depict.
    To take (i.e. draw or paint) a picture of a person.
  • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Matthew XXIII.
    Jesus perceaved there wylynes, and sayde: Why tempte ye me ye ypocrytes? lett me se the tribute money. And they toke hym a peny.
verb
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To have or change a state of mind or body.
  • To endure or cope with.
    I can take the noise, but I can't take the smell.
  • (often with “for") To assume or interpret to be.
    Do you take me for a fool?.
    I take it you're not going?.
    Looking at him as he came into the room, I took him for his father.
    He was often taken to be a man of means.
  • (intransitive) To become.
    They took ill within 3 hours. She took sick with the flu.
  • To enroll (in a class, or a course of study).
    I plan to take math, physics, literature and flower arrangement this semester.
  • To participate in, undergo, or experience.
    Aren't you supposed to take your math final today? When will you take your vacation? I had to take a pee.
  • (intransitive) To habituate to or gain competency at a task.
    I take to swimming like a fish.
  • To perform or undertake, for example, a task.
    To take a trip; to take aim.
  • To experience or feel, for example, offence.
    To take a dislike; to take pleasure.
  • (reflexive) To go.
verb
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To derive, inherit, or draw (a name, quality, etc.) from something or someone specified.
verb
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To extract, as for quotation; excerpt.

To take a verse from the Bible.

verb
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To obtain or ascertain by observation, query, or experiment.

To take a poll, to take one's temperature.

verb
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To study; specif., to be enrolled as a student in.

To take an art course.

verb
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To write down; copy.

Take notes.

verb
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To make an impression of.

Take his fingerprints.

verb
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To win (a prize, reward, etc.)
verb
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To be the object of.
  • To undergo.
    To take a beating.
  • To withstand; endure; hold up against.
    A tire designed to take punishment; she can't take a joke.
verb
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To occupy oneself in; enjoy.

Take a nap.

verb
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(informal) on the take
  • Taking or seeking to take bribes or illegal income:
idiom
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(informal) take a bath
  • To experience serious financial loss:
idiom
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take account of
  • To take into consideration.
idiom
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take away from
  • To detract from:
    Drab curtains took away from the otherwise lovely room.
idiom
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take care
  • To be careful:
    Take care or you will slip on the ice.
idiom
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take care of
  • To assume responsibility for the maintenance, support, or treatment of.
idiom
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take charge
  • To assume control or command.
idiom
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take effect
  • To become operative, as under law or regulation:
    The curfew takes effect at midnight.
  • To produce the desired reaction:
    The antibiotics at last began to take effect.
idiom
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take exception
  • To express opposition by argument; object to:
    Took exception to the prosecutor's line of questioning.
idiom
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(slang) take five
  • To take a short rest or break, as of five or ten minutes.
idiom
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take for granted
  • To consider as true, real, or forthcoming; anticipate correctly.
  • To underestimate the value of:
    A publisher who took the editors for granted.
idiom
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take heart
  • To be confident or courageous.
idiom
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take hold
  • To seize, as by grasping.
  • To become established:
    The newly planted vines quickly took hold.
idiom
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take it
  • To understand; assume:
    As I take it, they won't accept the proposal.
  • To endure abuse, criticism, or other harsh treatment:
    If you can dish it out, you've got to learn to take it.
idiom
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(slang) take it on the chin
  • To endure punishment, suffering, or defeat.
idiom
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take it or leave it
  • To accept or reject unconditionally.
idiom
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(informal) take it out on
  • To abuse (someone) in venting one's own anger.
idiom
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take kindly to
  • To be receptive to:
    Take kindly to constructive criticism.
  • To be naturally attracted or fitted to; thrive on.
idiom
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(informal) take lying down
  • To submit to harsh treatment with no resistance:
    Refused to take the snub lying down.
idiom
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take notice of
  • To pay attention to.
idiom
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take (one's) breath away
  • To put into a state of awe or shock.
idiom
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take (one's) time
  • To act slowly or at one's leisure.
idiom
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take place
  • To happen; occur.
idiom
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take root
  • To become established or fixed.
  • To become rooted.
idiom
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take shape
  • To take on a distinctive form.
idiom
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take sick
  • To become ill.
idiom
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take sides
  • To associate with and support a particular faction, group, cause, or person.
idiom
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take stock
  • To take an inventory.
  • To make an estimate or appraisal, as of resources or of oneself.
idiom
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take stock in
  • To trust, believe in, or attach importance to.
idiom
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(law) take the bench
  • To become a judge.
  • To preside in court:
    The judge took the bench to hear the plaintiff's motion.
idiom
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take the cake
  • To be the most outrageous or disappointing.
  • To win the prize; be outstanding.
idiom
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take the count
  • To be defeated.
  • To be counted out in boxing.
idiom
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(slang) take the fall
  • To incur blame or censure, either willingly or unwillingly:
    A senior official who took the fall for the failed intelligence operation.
idiom
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take the floor
  • To rise to deliver a formal speech, as to an assembly.
idiom
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(slang) take the heat
  • To incur and endure heavy censure or criticism:
    Had a reputation for being able to take the heat in a crisis.
idiom
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(slang) take to the cleaners
  • To take all the money or possessions of, especially by outsmarting or swindling.
idiom
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take up for
  • To support (a person or group, for example) in an argument.
idiom
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take up the cudgels
  • To join in a dispute, especially in defense of a participant.
idiom
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(informal) take up with
  • To begin to associate with; consort with:
    Took up with a fast crowd.
idiom
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on the take
  • willing or seeking to take bribes or illicit income
idiom
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take after
  • to resemble (a parent, etc.) in some way
  • to run after or pursue
idiom
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take a meeting
  • to attend a business conference
idiom
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take amiss
  • to be wrong concerning; mistake
  • to misunderstand the reason behind (an act), esp. so as to become offended
idiom
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take back
  • to regain use or possession of
  • to retract (something said, promised, etc.)
  • to return (something), as to be exchanged
idiom
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take down
  • to remove from a higher place and put in a lower one; pull down
  • to unfasten; take apart
  • to make less conceited; humble
  • to put in writing; record
idiom
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take five (or ten, etc.)
  • take a break for five (or ten, etc.) minutes, as from working
idiom
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take for
  • to consider to be; regard as
  • to mistake for
idiom
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take hold
  • to take effect or become firmly established
    The new fad took hold quickly.
idiom
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take hold of
  • to seize; grasp
idiom
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take ill
  • to become ill (or sick)
idiom
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take in
  • to admit; receive
  • to reef or furl (a sail)
  • to make smaller or more compact
  • to include; comprise
  • to understand; comprehend
  • to cheat; trick; deceive
  • to visit, see, experience, etc.
    To take in all the sights.
  • to receive into one's home for pay
    To take in boarders.
idiom
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take it
  • to suppose; believe
  • to withstand difficulty, criticism, hardship, ridicule, etc.
idiom
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take it or leave it
  • accept it or not
idiom
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(informal) take it out of
  • to exhaust; tire
  • to obtain payment or satisfaction from
idiom
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take it out on
  • to make (another) suffer for one's own anger, irritation, bad temper, etc.
idiom
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take off
  • to remove (a garment, etc.)
  • to draw or conduct away
  • to deduct; subtract
  • to kill
  • to make a copy or likeness of
  • to leave the ground or water in flight
  • to start
  • to imitate in a burlesque manner; parody
  • to become very popular and successful
  • to rob
idiom
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take off after
  • to run after or pursue
idiom
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take on
  • to acquire; assume (form, quality, etc.)
  • to employ; hire
  • to begin to do (a task, etc.); undertake
  • to compete or play against; oppose
  • to show violent emotion, especially anger or sorrow
idiom
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take one's time
  • to be slow or unhurried; delay
idiom
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take out
  • to obtain by application to the proper authority
  • to escort, as on a date
  • to kill; specif., to assassinate
idiom
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take over
  • to assume control or possession of
idiom
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take to
  • to develop a habit or practice of doing, using, etc.
  • to apply oneself to (one's studies, work, etc.)
  • to become fond of; care for; be attracted to
idiom
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take up
  • to raise; lift
  • to make tighter or shorter
  • to pay off; recover by buying (a mortgage, note, etc.)
  • to absorb (a liquid)
  • to assume protection or custody of
  • to interrupt in disapproval or rebuke
  • to resume (something interrupted)
  • to occupy or fill (space or time)
idiom
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take upon oneself
  • to take the responsibility for; accept as a charge
  • to begin (to do something)
idiom
0
0
take up with
  • to become a friend or companion of
idiom
0
0

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
take
Plural:
takes

Origin of take

  • Middle English taken from Old English tacan from Old Norse taka

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English taken (“to take, lay hold of, grasp, strike"), from Old English tacan (“to grasp, touch"), probably of North Germanic origin, from Old Norse taka (“to touch, take"), from Proto-Germanic *tÄ“kanÄ… (“to touch"), from Proto-Indo-European *deh₁g-, *dh₁g- (“to touch"). Gradually displaced Middle English nimen (“to take"), from Old English niman (“to take"). Cognate with Icelandic taka (“to take"), Danish tage (“to take, seize"), Middle Dutch taken (“to grasp"), Middle Low German tacken (“to grasp"). See tackle.

    From Wiktionary