Stop meaning

stŏp
An order given to a bank to withhold payment on a check.
noun
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To stop is defined as to block, close, defeat, prevent from moving or bring to an end.

An example of to stop is a dam keeping water from flowing in a river.

An example of to stop is to apply the car's brakes and the car stands still at a red light.

verb
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To interrupt one's course or journey for a brief visit or stay. Often used with by, in, or off:

Stop by at a friend's house; stop in at the office; stop off at the gas station.

verb
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The act of stopping or the condition of being stopped.

Can't you put a stop to all this ruckus? Production is at a stop.

noun
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A halt or stay, as on a trip.

We made a stop in Austin.

noun
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A place at which someone or something stops.

A regular stop on my delivery route; a bus stop.

noun
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A device or means that obstructs, blocks, or plugs up.
noun
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A stop order.
noun
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A part in a mechanism that stops or regulates movement.
noun
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The effective aperture of a lens, controlled by a diaphragm.
noun
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A mark of punctuation, especially a period.
noun
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A line used for securing something temporarily.

A sail stop.

noun
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The depression between the muzzle and top of the skull of an animal, especially a dog.
noun
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A save made by a goalie.
noun
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A stopper.
noun
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A projecting stone, often carved, at the end of a molding.
noun
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A control mechanism on an audio or video player that causes a recording to stop playing.
noun
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Of, relating to, or being of use at the end of an operation or activity.

A stop code.

adjective
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To staunch (a cut, wound, etc.)
verb
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To block up (a passage, road, pipe, etc.) so as to make impassable; obstruct.
verb
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To fill in, plug up, or cover (a hole, cavity, opening, mouth, etc.)
verb
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To close (a bottle, jug, etc.) as with a cork or cap.
verb
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To prevent the passage or further passage of (water, light, etc.); block; intercept.
verb
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To prevent the movement or further movement of.
  • To halt the progress of (a person, animal, vehicle, etc.).
  • To check (a blow, stroke, or thrust); parry; counter.
  • To defeat (an opponent).
  • To intercept (a letter, etc.) in transit.
  • To baffle; perplex; nonplus.
verb
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To cease; desist from (with a gerund)

Stop talking.

verb
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To cause (an engine, machine, etc.) to cease operation.
verb
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To press down (a violin string, etc.) against the fingerboard to produce a desired tone.
verb
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To place a stop order on (a stock or other security)
verb
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To hold a card or cards that will prevent an opponent from running (a suit)
verb
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To insert punctuation marks in.
verb
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To keep (a person) from doing something contemplated.
verb
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To prevent the starting, advent, etc. of; preclude.
verb
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To notify one's bank to withhold payment on (one's check)
verb
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To cease moving, walking, proceeding, etc.; halt.
verb
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To leave off doing something; desist from continuing.
verb
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To cease operating or functioning.
verb
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To be able to go no further; come to an end.
verb
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To become clogged or choked.
verb
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To tarry or stay for a while, esp. as a customer or guest.
verb
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A stopping or being stopped; check; arrest; cessation; halt; specif., a pause in speech or at the end of a sense unit in verse.
noun
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A coming to an end; finish; end.
noun
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A stay or sojourn.
noun
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A place stopped at, as on a bus route.
noun
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An indentation in the face of an animal, esp. a dog, between the forehead and the nose or muzzle.
noun
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Something that stops; obstruction; obstacle.
  • A plug or stopper.
  • An order to withhold payment on a check.
  • A mechanical part that stops, limits, or regulates motion, as a pawl.
  • A punctuation mark, esp. a period.
noun
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A piece of line used to secure something, as a sail.
noun
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That stops or is meant to stop.

A stop signal.

adjective
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The depression between the muzzle and top of the skull of an animal, especially a dog.
noun
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(intransitive) To cease moving.

I stopped at the traffic lights.

verb
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(intransitive) To come to an end.

The riots stopped when police moved in.

Soon the rain will stop.

verb
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To cause (something) to cease moving or progressing.

The sight of the armed men stopped him in his tracks.

This guy is a fraudster. I need to stop the cheque I wrote him.

verb
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To cause (something) to come to an end.

The referees stopped the fight.

verb
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To close or block an opening.

He stopped the wound with gauze.

verb
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(intransitive, photography, often with "up" or "down") To adjust the aperture of a camera lens.

To achieve maximum depth of field, he stopped down to an f-stop of 22.

verb
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(intransitive) To stay; to spend a short time; to reside temporarily.

To stop with a friend.

He stopped for two weeks at the inn.

verb
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(intransitive) To tarry.

He stopped at his friend's house before continuing with his drive.

verb
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(music) To regulate the sounds of (musical strings, etc.) by pressing them against the fingerboard with the finger, or otherwise shortening the vibrating part.
verb
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(nautical) To make fast; to stopper.
verb
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A (usually marked) place where line buses, trams or trains halt to let passengers get on and off.

They agreed to see each other at the bus stop.

noun
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An action of stopping; interruption of travel.

That stop was not planned.

noun
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A device intended to block the path of a moving object; as, a door stop.
noun
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(linguistics) A consonant sound in which the passage of air through the mouth is temporarily blocked by the lips, tongue, or glottis.
noun
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A symbol used for purposes of punctuation and representing a pause or separating clauses, particularly a full stop, comma, colon or semicolon.
noun
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That which stops, impedes, or obstructs; an obstacle; an impediment.

Pull out all the stops.

noun
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A function that halts playback or recording in devices such as videocassette and DVD player.
noun
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(by extension) A button that activates the stop function.
noun
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(music) A knob or pin used to regulate the flow of air in an organ.

The organ is loudest when all the stops are pulled.

noun
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(tennis) A very short shot which touches the ground close behind the net and is intended to bounce as little as possible.
noun
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(zoology) The depression in a dog's face between the skull and the nasal bones.

The stop in a bulldog's face is very marked.

noun
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(photography) An f-stop.
noun
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(engineering) A device, or piece, as a pin, block, pawl, etc., for arresting or limiting motion, or for determining the position to which another part shall be brought.
noun
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(architecture) A member, plain or moulded, formed of a separate piece and fixed to a jamb, against which a door or window shuts.
noun
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The diaphragm used in optical instruments to cut off the marginal portions of a beam of light passing through lenses.
noun
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He's stop still.

adverb
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(UK dialectal) A small well-bucket; a milk-pail.
noun
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To close (an opening or hole) by covering, filling in, or plugging up.

The tea leaves stopped the drain.

verb
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To constrict (an opening or orifice).

My nose is stopped up.

verb
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To obstruct or block passage on (a road, for example).
verb
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To prevent the flow or passage of.

Stop supplies from getting through.

verb
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To discontinue or cease.

He stopped his complaining.

verb
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To order a bank to withhold payment of.

Stopped the check.

verb
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To cease moving, progressing, acting, or operating; come to a halt.

The clock stopped in the night.

verb
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To put an end to what one is doing; cease.

Had to stop at an exciting place in the book.

verb
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pull out all (the) stops
  • To apply maximum effort; use every means possible.
idiom
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put a stop to
  • To cause to cease; stop; end.
idiom
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stop at nothing
  • To be ruthlessly resolute in pursuing an end.
idiom
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stop down
  • To reduce the lens aperture by adjustment of the diaphragm.
idiom
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stop off
  • To stop for a short stay en route to a place.
idiom
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stop out
  • To interrupt one's education as in order to work.
  • To block out (areas not to be printed or painted) as of a silk-screen design.
idiom
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stop over
  • To visit for a while.
  • To break a journey, as for rest.
idiom
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Origin of stop

  • Middle English stoppen from Old English -stoppian probably from Vulgar Latin stuppāre to caulk from Latin stuppa tow, broken flax from Greek stuppē
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English stoppe, from Old English stoppa (“bucket, pail, a stop"), from Proto-Germanic *stuppô (“vat, vessel"), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)teub- (“to push, hit; stick, stump"). Cognate with Norwegian stopp, stoppa (“deep well, recess"), Middle High German stubech, stübich ("barrel, vat, unit of measure"; > German Stübchen). Related also to Middle Low German stōp (“beaker, flask"), Middle High German stouf (“beaker, flask"), Norwegian staupa (“goblet"), Icelandic staupa (“shot-glass"), Old English stÄ“ap (“a stoup, beaker, drinking vessel, cup, flagon"). Cognate to Albanian shtambë (“amphora, bucket"). See stoup.
    From Wiktionary
  • From Middle English stoppen, stoppien, from Old English stoppian (“to stop, close"), from Proto-Germanic *stuppōnÄ… (“to stop, close"), *stuppijanÄ… (“to push, pierce, prick"), from Proto-Indo-European *stÁb(h)-, *stemb(h)- (“to support, stamp, become angry, be amazed"). Cognate with West Frisian stopje (“to stop"), Dutch stoppen (“to stop"), Low German stoppen (“to stop"), German stopfen (“to be filling, stuff"), German stoppen (“to stop"), Danish stoppe (“to stop"), Swedish & Icelandic stoppa (“to stop"), Middle High German stupfen, stüpfen (“to pierce"). More at stuff, stump.
    From Wiktionary
  • Alternate etymology derives Proto-Germanic *stuppōnÄ… from an assumed Vulgar Latin *stÅ«pāre, *stuppāre (“to stop up with tow"), from stÅ«pa, stÄ«pa, stuppa (“tow, flax, oakum"), from Ancient Greek στύπη (stýpÄ“), στύππη (stýppÄ“, “tow, flax, oakum"), from Proto-Indo-European *steyÉ™- (“to thicken, clump up, condense"). This derivation, however, is doubtful, as the earliest instances of the Germanic verb do not carry the meaning of "stuff, stop with tow". Rather, these senses developed later in response to influence from similar sounding words in Latin and Romance.
    From Wiktionary