Block meaning

blŏk
The definition of a block is a square piece of material that usually has flat surfaces that may be used for building things, as a child's toy, or as a work surface.

An example of a block is a large piece of wood that is square in shape.

An example of a block is a child's four-sided toy that he can stack up or use to build things.

An example of a block is a piece of wood or work surface on which you chop up food.

noun
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A stand from which articles are displayed and sold at an auction.

Many priceless antiques went on the block.

noun
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A large building divided into separate units, such as apartments.
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A length of railroad track controlled by signals.
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Something that obstructs; an obstacle.

The disabled car formed a block in traffic.

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The act of preventing someone or something from advancing, passing, or progressing, as:
  • An act of bodily obstruction, as of a player or the ball.
  • An act of legally using one's body to obstruct or move a defensive player so that a player in possession of the ball may advance downfield, pass, or otherwise execute an offensive play.
noun
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Interruption or obstruction of a physiological function.

Nerve block.

noun
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A sudden cessation of speech or a thought process without an immediate observable cause, sometimes considered a consequence of repression.
noun
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To block means to prevent something from happening or to make forward movement impossible.

An example of block is when you cut the funding for a program, preventing it from going forward.

An example of block is when you stand in a person's way so he cannot move forward.

verb
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A mold or form on which an item is shaped or displayed.

A hat block.

noun
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A substance, such as wood or stone, that has been prepared for engraving.
noun
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A bloc.
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A set of like items, such as shares of stock, sold or handled as a unit.
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A group of four or more unseparated postage stamps forming a rectangle.
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A group of townships in an unsurveyed area.
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The human head.

Threatened to knock my block off.

noun
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To suffer a mental block. Often used with on:

I blocked on his name.

verb
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Any large, solid piece of wood, stone, or metal, often with flat surfaces.
noun
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A blocklike stand or platform on which hammering, chopping, etc. is done.

A butcher's block, headsman's block.

noun
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An auctioneer's platform.
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Anything that stops movement or progress; obstruction, obstacle, or hindrance.
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A pulley or system of pulleys in a frame, with a hook, loop, etc. for attachment.
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Any solid piece of material used to strengthen or support.
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A toy brick, typically cubic, of wood or plastic, and with numbers, letters, etc. displayed on the sides.
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A large building with many units in it, or a group of buildings regarded as a unit.
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Any number of persons or things regarded as a unit.

A block of tickets.

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The metal casting that houses the cylinders of an internal-combustion engine; engine block.
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A person's head.
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A unit of memory, consisting of one or more contiguous words, bytes, or records.
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A piece of wood, linoleum, etc. engraved with a design or picture.
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A length of track governed by signals.
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An interruption, restraining, or thwarting of an opponent's play or movement.
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A set of four or more unseparated stamps forming a rectangle.
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noun
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To impede the passage or progress of; obstruct.
verb
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To blockade.
verb
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To create difficulties for; stand in the way of; hinder.
verb
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To form into blocks.
verb
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To strengthen or support with blocks.
verb
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To restrict or prohibit the use, conversion, or flow of (currency, assets, etc.)
verb
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To sketch or outline with little or no detail.
verb
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To hinder (an opponent or an opponent's play), whether legally or as a foul.

To block a linebacker, to block a shot.

verb
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To prevent the transmission of impulses in (a nerve), esp. by anesthetizing.
verb
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To plan or direct (the movements on stage of actors)
verb
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To have a mental block (on)
verb
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To block an opponent.
verb
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Made or formed in a block or blocks.

Block coal.

adjective
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Set out like or involving a city block.
adjective
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Having no indentation in address, heading, or paragraphs.
adjective
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Interruption, especially obstruction, of a normal physiological function.
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Interruption, complete or partial, permanent or temporary, of the passage of a nervous impulse.
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Atrioventricular block.
noun
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Sudden cessation of speech or a thought process without an immediate observable cause, sometimes considered a consequence of repression; mental block.
noun
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To arrest passage through; obstruct.
verb
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To interrupt or obstruct the functioning of a physiological process, especially by the use of drugs.
verb
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(1) A group of disk or tape records that is stored and transferred as a single unit. On a CD, a block consists of 98 frames of 33 bytes for a total of 3,234 bytes, or 1/75th of a second. See block level.
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A group of bits, often comprising an integral number of bytes, encoded, processed, transmitted, or otherwise treated as a unit. See also bit, byte, and encode.
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A substantial, often approximately cuboid, piece of any substance.

A block of ice.

A block of stone.

Anne Boleyn placed her head on the block and awaited her execution.

noun
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A group of urban lots of property, several acres in extent, not crossed by public streets.

I'm going for a walk around the block.

noun
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A residential building consisting of flats.

A block of flats.

noun
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The distance from one street to another in a city that is built (approximately) to a grid pattern.

The place you are looking for is two long blocks east and one short block north.

noun
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(slang) The human head.

I'll knock your block off.

noun
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A wig block: a simplified head model upon which wigs are worn.
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A mould on which hats, bonnets, etc., are shaped.
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A set of sheets (of paper) joined together at one end.

A block of 100 tickets.

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(computing) A logical data storage unit containing one or more physical sectors (see cluster).
noun
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(computing) A region of code in a program that acts as a single unit, such as a function or loop.
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(cryptography) A fixed-length group of bits making up part of a message.
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(rigging) A case with one or more sheaves/pulleys, used with ropes to increase or redirect force, for example, as part of the rigging of a sailing ship.
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(chemistry) A portion of a macromolecule, comprising many units, that has at least one feature not present in adjacent portions.
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Something that prevents something from passing (see blockage).

There's a block in the pipe that means the water can't get through.

noun
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(sports) An action to interfere with the movement of an opposing player or of the object of play (ball, puck).
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(cricket) A shot played by holding the bat vertically in the path of the ball, so that it loses momentum and drops to the ground.
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(volleyball) A defensive play by one or more players meant to deflect a spiked ball back to the hitter’s court.
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(philately) A joined group of four (in some cases nine) postage stamps, forming a roughly square shape.
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A section of split logs used as fuel.
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(UK) Solitary confinement.
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(falconry) The perch on which a bird of prey is kept.
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(printing, dated) A piece of hard wood on which a stereotype or electrotype plate is mounted.
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A section of a railroad where the block system is used.
noun
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Common misspelling of bloc.
noun
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To fill (something) so that it is not possible to pass.

The pipe is blocked.

verb
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To prevent (something or someone) from passing.

You're blocking the road – I can't get through.

verb
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To prevent (something from happening or someone from doing something).

His plan to take over the business was blocked by the boss.

verb
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(sports) To impede an opponent.

He blocked the basketball player's shot.

The offensive linemen tried to block the blitz.

verb
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(theater) To specify the positions and movements of the actors.

It was very difficult to block this scene convincingly.

verb
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(cricket) To hit with a block.
verb
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(intransitive, cricket) To play a block shot.
verb
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To disable communication via telephone, instant messaging, etc., with an undesirable someone.

I tried to send you a message, but you've blocked me!

verb
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(computing, intransitive) To wait.

When the condition expression is false, the thread blocks on the condition variable.

verb
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To stretch or mould (a knitted item, a hat, etc.) into the desired shape.

I blocked the mittens by wetting them and pinning them to a shaped piece of cardboard.

verb
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A block is defined as an area of four streets that goes in a square, or a single street within an area of four streets, or the length of one of those streets.

An example of a block is the four streets that go in a square around your house.

An example of a block is the street your house is located on.

An example of a block is the distance you need to walk to get from your street to the next street over.

noun
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To support, strengthen, or retain in place by means of a block.
verb
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To shape, mold, or form with or on a block.

Block a hat.

verb
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To indicate broadly without great detail; sketch. Often used with out:

Block out a plan of action; block out stage movements.

verb
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To run (trains) on a block system.
verb
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go on the block
  • To be offered for sale.
idiom
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out of the blocks
  • From a starting position, as in a race or contest:.
    The company has in the past been slow out of the blocks to adapt to consumer tastes.
idiom
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put on the block
  • To offer for sale.
idiom
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block up
  • To fill in (a passage, space, etc.) so as to obstruct.
  • To elevate on blocks.
idiom
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go to the block
  • To be beheaded.
  • To be up for sale in an auction.
idiom
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have been around the block
  • To have acquired much practical experience; specif., to be streetwise or sexually experienced.
idiom
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knock someone's block off
  • To give a beating to.
idiom
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on the block
  • Up for sale or auction.
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out of the blocks
  • Beginning or emerging, esp. in a competitive situation.
    A company that is the first out of the blocks with a new technology.
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

go on the block
out of the blocks
go to the block
out of the blocks

Origin of block

  • Middle English blok from Old French bloc from Middle Dutch

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English blok (“log, stump, solid piece”), from Old French bloc (“log, block”), from Middle Dutch blok (“treetrunk”), from Old Saxon *blok (“log”), from Proto-Germanic *blukką (“beam, log”), from Proto-Indo-European *bhulg'-, from *bhelg'- (“thick plank, beam, pile, prop”). Cognate with Old High German bloh, bloc (German Block, “block”), Old English bolca (“gangway of a ship, plank”), Old Norse bǫlkr (Norwegian bolk, “divider, partition”). More at balk.

    From Wiktionary