Scaffold meaning

skăfəld, -ōld
Frequency:
To provide or support with a raised framework or platform.
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The definition of a scaffold is a temporary wooden platform that workers can stand on when they are doing work, or a raised platform on which a criminal can be publicly executed.

An example of a scaffold is a raised wooden structure built around a building that window washers stand on in order to wash windows on high floors.

An example of a scaffold is a large raised wooden platform that criminals were publicly executed on during the French Revolution.

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A temporary platform, either supported from below or suspended from above, on which workers sit or stand when performing tasks at heights above the ground.
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A raised wooden framework or platform.
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A platform used in the execution of condemned prisoners, as by hanging or beheading.
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To place on a raised framework or platform.
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A temporary wooden or metal framework for supporting workmen and materials during the erecting, repairing, or painting of a building, etc.
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A raised platform on which criminals are executed, as by hanging.
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A temporary wooden stage or platform, as that on which medieval plays were presented.
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Any raised framework.
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To furnish or support with, or put on, a scaffold.
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A structure made of scaffolding, for workers to stand on while working on a building.
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An elevated platform on which a criminal is executed.
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(metalworking) An accumulation of adherent, partly fused material forming a shelf or dome-shaped obstruction above the tuyeres in a blast furnace.
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To set up a scaffolding; to surround a building with scaffolding.
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Origin of scaffold

  • Middle English from Medieval Latin scaffaldus of Old French origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English scaffold, scaffalde, from Medieval Latin scaffaldus, from Old French eschaffaut, escadafaut (“platform to see a tournament"), from Late Latin scadafaltum, from ex- + *cadafaltum, catafalcum (“view-stage"), from Old Italian *catare (“to view, see") + falco (“a stage"), a variant of balco (“stage, beam, balk"), from Lombardic palko, palcho (“scaffold, balk, beam"), from Proto-Germanic *balkô (“beam, rafter"), from Proto-Indo-European *bhelg- (“beam, plank"). Akin to Old High German balco, balcho (“scaffold, balk, beam"). More at catafalque, balcony, balk.

    From Wiktionary