Stage meaning

stāj
The definition of a stage is a platform or an area of raised floor.

An example of a stage is what dancers dance on during a professional performance.

noun
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To present, represent, or exhibit on or as on a stage.
verb
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A level, floor, or story.
noun
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The distance or a part of a route between two stopping places; leg of a journey.
noun
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A raised and level floor or platform.
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A resting place on a journey, especially one providing overnight accommodations.
noun
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A platform or dock.
noun
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A scaffold for workmen.
noun
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A place where a stop is made on a journey, esp., formerly, a regular stopping point for a stagecoach.
noun
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A period in the course of a disease.
noun
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A particular step, phase, or position in a developmental process.
noun
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A platform on a microscope that supports a slide for viewing.
noun
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To be suitable for presentation on the stage.

A play that stages well.

verb
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One of two or more successive propulsion units of a rocket vehicle that fires after the preceding one has been jettisoned.
noun
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(geology) A subdivision in the classification of stratified rocks, ranking just below a series and representing rock formed during a chronological age.
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(electronics) An element or a group of elements in a complex arrangement of parts, especially a single tube or transistor and its accessory components in an amplifier.
noun
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To produce or direct (a theatrical performance).
verb
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To arrange and carry out.

Stage an invasion.

verb
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(medicine) To determine the extent or progression of (a cancer, for example).
verb
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A platform, often floating, serving as a kind of wharf.
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A stagecoach, an enclosed horsedrawn carriage used to carry passengers.

The stage pulled into town carrying the payroll for the mill and three ladies.

noun
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(dated) A place of rest on a regularly travelled road; a station; a place appointed for a relay of horses.
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(dated) A degree of advancement in a journey; one of several portions into which a road or course is marked off; the distance between two places of rest on a road.

A stage of ten miles.

noun
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(electronics) The number of an electronic circuit's block, such as a filter, an amplifier, etc.

A 3-stage cascade of a 2nd-order bandpass Butterworth filter.

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The place on a microscope where the slide is located for viewing.

He placed the slide on the stage.

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(video games) A level; one of the sequential areas making up the game.

How do you get past the flying creatures in the third stage?

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A place where anything is publicly exhibited, or a remarkable affair occurs; the scene.
noun
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To produce on a stage, to perform a play.

The local theater group will stage "Pride and Prejudice".

verb
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To demonstrate in a deceptive manner.

The salesman's demonstration of the new cleanser was staged to make it appear highly effective.

verb
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(Of a protest or strike etc.) To carry out.
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To cause to pause or wait at a designated location.

We staged the cars to be ready for the start, then waited for the starter to drop the flag.

To stage data to be written at a later time.

verb
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To stage is defined as to arrange, present or exhibit something.

An example of to stage is decorating the inside of a house that's for sale for an open house.

verb
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The scene of an event or of a series of events.
noun
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A platform on a microscope that supports a slide for viewing.
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A scaffold for workers.
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The distance between stopping places on a journey; a leg.

Proceeded in easy stages.

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A stagecoach.
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A level or story of a building.
noun
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The height of the surface of a river or other fluctuating body of water above a set point.

At flood stage.

noun
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To be adaptable to or suitable for theatrical presentation.

A play that stages well.

verb
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To stop at a designated place in the course of a journey.
verb
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noun
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A shelf attached to a microscope for holding the object to be viewed.
noun
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A period, level, or degree in a process of development, growth, or change.

The larval stage of an insect.

noun
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Any of two or more propulsion units used, in sequence, as the launch vehicle of a missile, spacecraft, etc.: when no longer operational or useful, the lower stages usually separate and fall back to earth.
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(electronics) A component, circuit, etc. that does one specific job, as amplification, while being a part of a larger, more complex system.
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(geol.) A subdivision of a series of stratified rocks consisting of the rocks laid down during a geologic age.
noun
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To determine the extent or progression of a disease, especially a cancer.
verb
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He is in the recovery stage of his illness.

Completion of an identifiable stage of maintenance such as removing an aircraft engine for repair or storage.

noun
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The area, in any theatre, generally raised, upon which an audience watches plays or other public ceremonies.

The band returned to the stage to play an encore.

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A floor or storey of a house.

noun
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A floor elevated for the convenience of mechanical work, etc.; scaffolding; staging.
noun
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by easy stages
  • traveling only a short distance at a time
  • working or acting unhurriedly, with stops for rest
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

by easy stages

Origin of stage

  • Middle English from Old French estage from Vulgar Latin staticum from Latin status past participle of stāre to stand stā- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English stage, from Old French estage (“story of a building, performance stage, floor, loft"), from Vulgar Latin *stāticum (“standing-place"), from Latin stāre (“to stand"). Cognate with Old English stæde, stede (“state, status, standing, place"). More at stead.

    From Wiktionary