Phase meaning

fāz
A temporary manner, attitude, or pattern of behavior.

Just a passing phase.

noun
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To phase is to do something gradually over a period of time.

An example of phase is when you gradually introduce a new product or you phase in the new product over a few years.

verb
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An aspect; a part.

We must reconsider every phase of the operation.

noun
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A distinct stage of development.
noun
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To set or regulate so as to be synchronized.
verb
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A characteristic form, appearance, or stage of development that occurs in a cycle or that distinguishes some individuals of a group.

The white color phase of a weasel; the swarming phase of locusts.

noun
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Any of the recurrent stages of variation in the illumination and apparent shape of a moon or a planet.
noun
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To plan or carry out systematically by phases.
verb
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Any of the stages or forms in any series or cycle of changes, as in development.
noun
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To put in phase.
verb
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Any of the ways in which something may be observed, considered, or presented; aspect; side; part.

A problem with many phases.

noun
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A solid, liquid, or gaseous homogeneous form existing as a distinct part in a heterogeneous system.

Ice is a phase of H2O.

noun
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The fractional part of a cycle through which an oscillation, as of light or sound waves, has advanced, measured from an arbitrary starting point.
noun
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Any of the characteristic variations in color of the skin, fur, plumage, etc. of an animal, according to season, age, etc.
noun
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To plan, introduce, or carry out in phases, or stages.
verb
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To move by phases.
verb
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verb
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A characteristic form, appearance, or stage of development that occurs in a cycle.
noun
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A discrete homogeneous part of a material system that is mechanically separable from the rest, as is ice from water.
noun
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Any of the forms or states, solid, liquid, gas, or plasma, in which matter can exist, depending on temperature and pressure.
noun
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A distinct part in a course or development, as of a disease.
noun
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To introduce, one stage at a time.
verb
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Any of the forms, recurring in cycles, in which the Moon or a planet appears in the sky.
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One of a set of possible homogenous, discrete states of a physical system. States of matter such as solid and liquid are examples of phases, as are different crystal lattice structures in metals such as iron.
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A measure of how far some cyclic behavior, such as wave motion, has proceeded through its cycle, measured in degrees or radians. At the beginning of the phase, its value is zero; at one quarter of its cycle, its phase is 90 degrees (π/2 radians); halfway through the cycle its value is 180 degrees (π radians), and so on. &diamf3; The phase angle between two waves is a measure of their difference in phase. Two waves of the same frequency that are perfectly in phase have phase angle zero; if one wave is ahead of the other by a quarter cycle, its phase angle 90 degrees (π/2 radians); waves that are perfectly out of phase have phase angle 180 degrees (π radians), and so on.
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In a periodic function such as the cyclic variation of an electromagnetic waveform, a relative measurement that describes the relationship between the positions of a signal at two instants in time. In other words, phase is a measurement of the relative position of a waveform at a significant instant of the signal relative to a time scale. Phase is measured in degrees (
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A distinguishable part of a sequence or cycle occurring over time.
noun
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That which is exhibited to the eye; the appearance which anything manifests, especially any one among different and varying appearances of the same object.
noun
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Any appearance or aspect of an object of mental apprehension or view.

The problem has many phases.

noun
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(astronomy) A particular appearance or state in a regularly recurring cycle of changes with respect to quantity of illumination or form, or the absence, of its enlightened disk; as, the phases of the moon or planets. Illustrated in Wikipedia's article Lunar phase.
noun
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(physics) Any one point or portion in a recurring series of changes, as in the changes of motion of one of the particles constituting a wave or vibration; one portion of a series of such changes, in distinction from a contrasted portion, as the portion on one side of a position of equilibrium, in contrast with that on the opposite side.
noun
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(chemistry) A component in a material system that is distinguished by chemical composition and/or physical state (solid, liquid or gas) and/or crystal structure. It is delineated from an adjoining phase by an abrupt change in one or more of those conditions.
noun
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(rugby union) The period of play between consecutive breakdowns.
noun
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(genetics) A haplotype.
noun
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Common misspelling of faze.
verb
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(genetics, informal) To determine haplotypes in (data) when genotypes are known.
verb
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To pass into or through a solid object.
verb
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(obsolete) Passover.
pronoun
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The definition of a phase is a distinct period of time in something's development.

An example of a phase is the final part of a multiple part landscaping project.

An example of a phase is when you can the various shapes of the moon.

An example of phase is a period of time during which you are a teenager when you fight with your parents all the time.

noun
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in phase
  • In a correlated or synchronized way.
idiom
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out of phase
  • In an unsynchronized or uncorrelated way.
idiom
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in (or out of) phase
  • In (or not in) a state of exactly parallel movements, oscillations, etc.; in (or not in) synchronization.
idiom
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phase out
  • To bring or come to an end, or withdraw from use, by stages.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

in (<i>or</i> out of) phase

Origin of phase

  • Back-formation from New Latin phasēs phases of the moon from Greek phaseis pl. of phasis appearance from phainein to show bhā-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From New Latin phasis, from Ancient Greek φάσις (phásis, “an appearance”), from φάειν (phaein, “to shine”); compare phantasm and see face.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Latin phase (“passover”), Phasa, from Hebrew פָּסַח (pésach).

    From Wiktionary