Angle meaning

ăng'gəl
An angle is defined as a figure that is formed from two lines that meet at a common place.

The sides of a triangle are examples of lines that form an angle.

noun
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To fish with a hook and line.
verb
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A devious method; a scheme.
noun
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A fishhook or fishing tackle.
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A sharp or projecting corner, as of a building.
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To move or turn (something) at an angle.

Angled the chair toward the window.

verb
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To hit (a ball or puck, for example) at an angle.
verb
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To continue along or turn at an angle or by angles.

The road angles sharply to the left. The path angled through the woods.

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A member of a Germanic people that migrated to England from southern Jutland in the 5th century ad , founded the kingdoms of Northumbria, East Anglia, and Mercia, and together with the Jutes and Saxons formed the Anglo-Saxon peoples.
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The space between, or within, such lines or planes.
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The measure of this space, expressed in degrees, radians, or steradians.
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A sharp or projecting corner.
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An aspect, as of something viewed or considered; point of view.

To examine a problem from all angles.

noun
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To move or bend at an angle or by means of angles.
verb
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To fish with a hook and line.
verb
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To scheme or use tricks to get something.

To angle for a promotion.

verb
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A member of a Germanic people of the northern lowlands that settled in E England in the 5th cent. a.d.: the name England is from Englaland (land of the Angles), and English is from Englisc (of the Angles)
noun
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A geometric figure formed by two lines that begin at a common point or by two planes that begin at a common line.
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The space between such lines or planes, measured in degrees.
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​(geometry) A figure formed by two rays which start from a common point (a plane angle) or by three planes that intersect (a solid angle).

The angle between lines A and B.

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​(geometry) The measure of such a figure. In the case of a plane angle, this is the ratio (proportional to the ratio) of the arc length to the radius of a section of a circle cut by the two rays, centered at their common point. In the case of a solid angle, this is the ratio of the surface area to the square of the radius of the section of a sphere.

The angle between lines A and B is π/4 radians, or 45 degrees.

noun
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A corner where two walls intersect.

An angle of a building.

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A change in direction.

The horse took off at an angle.

noun
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​ A viewpoint; a way of looking at something.
  • 2013 January 1, Katie L. Burke, “Ecological Dependency”, American Scientist, volume 101, number 1, page 64.
    In his first book since the 2008 essay collection Natural Acts: A Sidelong View of Science and Nature, David Quammen looks at the natural world from yet another angle: the search for the next human pandemic, what epidemiologists call “the next big one.”.
  • 2005, Adams Media, Adams Job Interview Almanac (page 299).
    For example, if I was trying to repitch an idea to a producer who had already turned it down, I would say something like, "I remember you said you didn't like my idea because there was no women's angle. Well, here's a great one that both of us must have missed during our first conversation.".
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(media) The focus of a news story.
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(slang, professional wrestling) A storyline between two wrestlers, providing the background for and approach to a feud.
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(slang) A scheme; a means of benefitting from a situation, usually hidden, possibly illegal.

His angle is that he gets a percentage, but mostly in trade.

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A projecting or sharp corner; an angular fragment.
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(astrology) Any of the four cardinal points of an astrological chart: the Ascendant, the Midheaven, the Descendant and the Imum Coeli.
noun
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(often in the passive) To place (something) at an angle.

The roof is angled at 15 degrees.

verb
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(informal) To present or argue something in a particular way or from a particular viewpoint.

How do you want to angle this when we talk to the client?

verb
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(snooker) To leave the cue ball in the jaws of a pocket such that the surround of the pocket (the "angle") blocks the path from cue ball to object ball.
verb
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(intransitive) To try to catch fish with a hook and line.
verb
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(informal) (with for) To attempt to subtly persuade someone to offer a desired thing.

He must be angling for a pay rise.

verb
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A fishhook; tackle for catching fish, consisting of a line, hook, and bait, with or without a rod.
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anagrams
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A member of a Germanic tribe first mentioned by Tacitus, one of several which invaded Britain and merged to become the Anglo-Saxons.
noun
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(geometry, of a two-dimensional shape) Having the specified number of internal angles.
suffix
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To impart a biased aspect or point of view to.

Angled the story in a way that criticized the candidate.

verb
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To give a specific point of view to (a story, report, etc.)
verb
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To try to get something by indirect or artful means.

Angle for a promotion.

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(intransitive, informal) To change direction rapidly.

The five ball angled off the nine ball but failed to reach the pocket.

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Origin of angle

  • Middle English anglen from angel fishhook from Old English
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Latin Anglī the Angles of Germanic origin
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English from Old French from Latin angulus
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English anglelen (“to fish”), from angel (“fishhook”), from Old English angel, angul (“fishhook”), from Proto-Germanic *angulō, *angô (“hook, angle”), from Proto-Indo-European *ank-, *Hank- (“something bent, hook”). Cognate with West Frisian angel (“fishing rod, stinger”), Dutch angel (“fishhook”), German Angel (“fishing pole”), German angeln (“to fish, angle”).
    From Wiktionary
  • From Middle English, from Middle French angle, from Latin angulus (“corner, remote area”), from Proto-Indo-European *ang- (“corner, hirn”). Cognate with Old High German ancha (“nape of the neck”), Middle High German anke (“joint of the foot, nape of neck”).
    From Wiktionary
  • Mostly derived from the toponym Angle, from *anguz "narrow, tight; tapering, angular", either indicating the "narrow" water (i.e. the Schlei estuary), or the "angular" shape of the peninsula.
    From Wiktionary