Gerrymander meaning

jĕr'ē-măn'dər, gĕr'-
The definition of a gerrymander is a changing of voting districts to give one party an advantage or disadvantage a group.

An example of a gerrymander is a creation of a smaller voting district to take away votes from a particular candidate.

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Gerrymander is defined as to divide a voting area to give one political party a majority.

An example of gerrymander is to change the geographic boundries of a voting district so that more voters from one political party are included.

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To divide (a geographic area) into voting districts in a way that gives one party an unfair advantage in elections.
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The act, process, or an instance of gerrymandering.
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A district or configuration of districts whose boundaries are very irregular due to gerrymandering.
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To divide (a voting area) so as to give one political party a majority in as many districts as possible or weaken the voting strength of an ethnic or racial group, urban population, etc.
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To manipulate unfairly so as to gain advantage.
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To engage in gerrymandering.
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A redistricting of voting districts to the advantage of one party or disadvantage of a group, region, etc.
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(pejorative) To divide a geographic area into voting districts in such a way as to give an unfair advantage to one party in an election.
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(pejorative, by extension) To draw dividing lines for other types of districts in an unintuitive way to favor a particular group or for other perceived gain.

The superintendent helped gerrymander the school district lines in order to keep the children of the wealthy gated community in the better school all the way across town.

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(pejorative) The act of gerrymandering.

By this iniquitous practice, which is known as the gerrymander, the party in a minority in each State is allowed to get only about one-half or one-quarter of its proper share of representation.

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(pejorative) A voting district skewed by gerrymandering.

Any citizen looking at a map of district 12 could immediately tell that it was a gerrymander because of the ridiculous way it cut across 4 counties while carving up neighborhoods in half.

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Origin of gerrymander

  • After Elbridge Gerry (sala)mander (from the shape of an election district created while Gerry was governor of Massachusetts)
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From (Elbridge) Gerry + (sala)mander, from the similarity in shape to a salamander of an electoral district created when Gerry was the governor of Massachusetts
    From Wiktionary