Incline meaning

ĭn-klīn'
To dispose (someone) to have a certain preference or opinion or to take a course of action.

I'm inclined to agree with you. Are you inclined to go to out tonight?

verb
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To cause (someone) to have a certain tendency: dispose.
verb
2
2
To cause to lean, slant, or slope.
verb
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To bend or lower in a nod or bow.

I inclined my head in acquiescence.

verb
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To be disposed to a certain preference, opinion, or course of action.

Some researchers incline toward a different view of the problem.

verb
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To deviate from the horizontal or vertical; slant.

When the path inclined steeply, it became difficult to continue hiking.

verb
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To lower or bend the head or body, as in a nod or bow.
verb
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An inclined surface; a slope or gradient.

The car rolled down the incline.

noun
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To deviate from a horizontal or vertical position, course, etc.; lean; slope; slant.
verb
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To bend or bow the body or head.
verb
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To cause to lean, slope, slant, etc.; bend.
verb
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To bend or bow (the body or head)
verb
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To give a tendency to; make willing; dispose; influence.
verb
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An inclined plane or surface; slope; grade; slant.
noun
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To bend or move (something) out of a given plane or direction, often the horizontal or vertical.
verb
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(intransitive) To slope.
verb
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To tend to do or believe something, or move or be moved in a certain direction, away from a point of view, attitude, etc.
verb
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noun
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incline one's ear
  • To pay heed; listen willingly.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

incline one's ear

Origin of incline

  • Middle English enclinen from Old French encliner from Latin inclīnāre in- into, toward in–2 -clīnāre to lean klei- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Old French encliner (modern incliner), from Latin inclÄ«nō (“incline, tilt"), from in- + clÄ«nō (compare -cline), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱley- (English lean).
    From Wiktionary