Steep meaning

stēp
Steep is defined as a place that has an almost vertical incline.

An example of steep is a flight of stairs going almost straight up.

noun
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To soak in liquid in order to cleanse, soften, or extract a given property from.
verb
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A precipitous slope.
noun
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At a rapid or precipitous rate.

A steep rise in imports.

adjective
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To infuse or subject thoroughly to.
verb
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2
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Of a near-vertical gradient; of a slope, surface, curve, etc. that proceeds upward at an angle near vertical.

A steep hill or mountain; a steep roof; a steep ascent; a steep barometric gradient.

adjective
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(informal) Expensive.

Twenty quid for a shave? That's a bit steep.

adjective
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(intransitive) To soak an item (to be soaked) in liquid in order to gradually add or remove components to or from the item.

They steep skins in a tanning solution to create leather.

The tea is steeping.

verb
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(intransitive) To imbue with something.

A town steeped in history.

verb
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To make tea (other beverage) by placing leaves in hot water.
verb
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A liquid used in a steeping process.

Corn steep has many industrial uses.

noun
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A rennet bag.
noun
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The definition of steep is having an almost vertical incline.

An example of steep is a set of stairs with high steps.

adjective
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1
Having a sharp inclination; precipitous.
adjective
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To make thoroughly wet; saturate.
verb
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To undergo a soaking in liquid.
verb
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Having a sharp rise or highly inclined slope; precipitous.

A steep incline.

adjective
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(obs.) High; lofty.
adjective
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A steep slope or incline.
noun
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To immerse, saturate, absorb, or imbue.

Steeped in folklore.

verb
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To be steeped.
verb
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A steeping or being steeped.
noun
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Liquid in which something is steeped.
noun
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Steep means to soak in liquid.

An example of steep is to place a teabag in hot water.

verb
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A liquid, bath, or solution in which something is steeped.
noun
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To soak in liquid, so as to soften, clean, extract the essence of, etc.
verb
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2

Origin of steep

  • Middle English stepen perhaps of Old English origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English stepe from Old English stēap

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English stepen, from Old Norse steypa (“to make stoop, cast down, pour out, cast (metal)"), from Proto-Germanic *staupijanÄ… (“to tumble, make tumble, plunge"), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)tewb- (“to push, hit"). Cognate with Danish støbe (“cast (metal)"), Norwegian støpe, støype, Swedish stöpa (“to found, cast (metal)"), Old English stÅ«pian (“to stoop, bend the back, slope"). More at stoop.

    From Wiktionary

  • Old English stÄ“ap (“high"), from Proto-Germanic *staupaz (compare Old Frisian stap, Middle High German *stouf), from Proto-Indo-European *steup- (“to push, stick"). The Proto-Indo-European root (related) has many and varied descendants, including English stub; compare also Scots stap (“to strike, to forcibly insert").

    From Wiktionary

  • The sense of “sharp slope" is attested circa 1200; the sense “expensive" is attested US 1856.

    From Wiktionary