Soak meaning

sōk
To soak is to physically or mentally absorb something.

An example of to soak is to lay in the sunshine.

An example of to soak is to appreciate a beautiful view.

verb
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The definition of a soak is something being immersed in liquid for an extended period.

An example of a soak is sitting in a warm bath.

noun
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To submerge or keep in a liquid, as for thorough wetting, softening, for hydrotherapy, etc.
verb
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To soak is slang for to overcharge someone.

An example of to soak is to add on extra charges to a taxi cab fare.

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To soak is to get something completely wet, or for liquid to go into something.

An example of to soak is to submerge a rag in water.

An example of to soak is for stain to absorb into wood.

verb
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To remove (a stain, for example) by continued immersion.

Soaked out the grease spots.

verb
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To charge (a person) an inordinate amount for something.

People were getting soaked during the gas shortage.

verb
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To be immersed in liquid.

The beans are soaking.

verb
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To drink to excess.
verb
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The act or process of soaking.

Had a long soak in the bath.

noun
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Liquid in which something may be soaked.
noun
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A drunkard.
noun
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To make thoroughly wet; drench or saturate.

Soaked to the skin by the rain.

verb
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To charge heavily or too dearly; overcharge.
verb
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To stay immersed in water or other liquid for wetting, softening, etc.
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To pass or penetrate as a liquid does; permeate.

Rain soaking through his coat.

verb
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To become absorbed mentally.

The fact soaked into his head.

verb
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The act or process of soaking.
noun
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The state of being soaked.
noun
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Liquid used for soaking or steeping.
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A drunkard.
noun
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(intransitive) To be saturated with liquid by being immersed in it.

I'm going to soak in the bath for a couple of hours.

verb
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To immerse in liquid to the point of saturation or thorough permeation.

Soak the beans overnight before cooking.

verb
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(intransitive) To penetrate or permeate by saturation.

The water soaked into my shoes and gave me wet feet.

verb
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To allow (especially a liquid) to be absorbed; to take in, receive. (usually + up)

A sponge soaks up water; the skin soaks in moisture.

I soaked up all the knowledge I could at university.

verb
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(slang, dated) To drink intemperately or gluttonously.
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(metallurgy) To heat a metal before shaping it.
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(ceramics) To hold a kiln at a particular temperature for a given period of time.

We should soak the kiln at cone 9 for half an hour.

verb
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(figuratively) To absorb; to drain.

verb
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An immersion in water etc.
noun
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(slang, UK) A drunkard.
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(Australia) A low-lying depression that fills with water after rain.
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soak out
  • To draw out (dirt, etc.) by or as by soaking.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

soak out

Origin of soak

  • Middle English soken from Old English socian seuə-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English soken, from Old English socian (“to soak, steep", literally “to cause to suck (up)"), from Proto-Germanic *sukōnÄ… (“to soak"), causative of Proto-Germanic *sÅ«kanÄ… (“to suck"). Cognate with Middle Dutch soken (“to cause to suck"). More at suck.

    From Wiktionary