Absorb definition

əb-zôrb, -sôrb
To suck up.

Blotting paper absorbs ink.

verb
17
5
To take in and not reflect (light, sound, etc.)
verb
10
1
To take in; assimilate.

Immigrants who were absorbed into the social mainstream.

verb
15
8
To assume the burden of (costs or expenses)
verb
6
0
To assume or pay for (a cost or costs).
verb
9
4
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To take in and incorporate; assimilate.
verb
9
4
To take in (a shock or jolt) with little or no recoil or reaction.
verb
5
2
To take up the full attention or energy of; engross.
verb
4
1
Absorb means to soak up.

An example of absorb is when a towel takes in water from your body after a bath.

verb
3
0
Absorb is defined as to take in something and make it part of a larger unit.

An example of absorb is a big company that takes over a smaller one.

verb
3
0
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To take (something) in through or as through pores or interstices.
verb
2
1
The definition of absorb means to completely have someone’s attention.

An example of absorb is to be thoroughly engaged in a hobby and lose track of time.

verb
1
0
To use up; consume.

The project has absorbed all of our department's resources.

verb
1
0
To occupy the attention, interest, or time of; engross.

The problem completely absorbed her.

verb
1
0
To take up or occupy (one's time or interest, for example).
verb
1
0
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To include so that it no longer has separate existence; to overwhelm; to cause to disappear as if by swallowing up; to incorporate; to assimilate; to take in and use up. [First attested around 1350 to 1470.]
verb
1
0
To suck up; to drink in; to imbibe; as a sponge or as the lacteals of the body; to chemically take in. [First attested in the early 17th century.]
verb
1
0
(physics, chemistry) To take in energy and convert it, as[First attested in the early 18th century.]
  • (physics) In receiving a physical impact or vibration without recoil.
  • (physics) In receiving sound energy without repercussion or echo.
  • (physics) Taking in radiant energy and converting it to a different form of energy, like heat.

Heat, light, and electricity are absorbed in the substances into which they pass.

verb
1
0
To engross or engage wholly; to occupy fully; as, absorbed in study or in the pursuit of wealth. [First attested in the late 18th century.]
verb
1
0
To occupy or consume time. [First attested in the mid 19th century.]
verb
1
0
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Assimilate mentally. [First attested in the late 19th century.]
verb
1
0
(business) To assume or pay for as part of a commercial transaction.
verb
1
0
To defray the costs.
verb
1
0
To accept or purchase in quantity.
verb
1
0
To learn; acquire.
verb
6
6
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To receive (an impulse) without echo or recoil.

A fabric that absorbs sound; a bumper that absorbs impact.

verb
6
6
To endure; accommodate.

Couldn't absorb the additional hardships.

verb
6
6
To retain (radiation or sound, for example) wholly, without reflection or transmission.
verb
1
2

Origin of absorb

  • Middle English to swallow up from Old French absorber from Latin absorbēre ab- away ab–1 sorbēre to suck

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • First attested around 1425. From Middle French absorber, from Old French assorbir,from Latin absorbeō (“swallow up”), from ab (“from”) + sorbeō (“suck in, swallow”); akin to Ancient Greek ῥοφέω (ropheō, “sup up”), Middle Irish srub (“snout”), Lithuanian srēbti (“to sip”), and perhaps to Middle High German sürpfeln (“to sip”), and Norwegian slurpe. Compare French absorber.

    From Wiktionary