Engage meaning

ĕn-gāj
Engage is defined as to get someone interested in something or to have a conversation or discussion with someone.

An example of engage is a hobby that you enjoy and lose track of time doing.

An example of engage is when you start talking to someone.

verb
5
1
To obtain or contract for the services of; employ.

Engage a carpenter.

verb
3
0
To pledge or promise, especially to marry.

Was engaged to a famous actor.

verb
3
1
To arrange for the use of; reserve.

Engage a room.

verb
2
0
To interlock or cause to interlock; mesh.

Engage the automobile's clutch.

verb
2
0
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To involve oneself or become occupied; participate.

Engage in conversation.

verb
1
0
To arrange for the use of; reserve.

To engage a hotel room.

verb
1
0
To draw into; involve.

To engage him in conversation.

verb
1
0
To attract and hold the attention of; engross.

A hobby that engaged her for hours at a time.

verb
0
0
To draw into; involve.

Engage a shy person in conversation.

verb
0
0
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To require the use of; occupy.

Studying engages most of my time.

verb
0
0
To enter or bring into conflict with.

We have engaged the enemy.

verb
0
0
To give or take as security.
verb
0
0
To assume an obligation; agree.
verb
0
0
To enter into conflict or battle.

The armies engaged at dawn.

verb
0
0
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To become meshed or interlocked.

The gears engaged.

verb
0
0
Actively committed, as to a political cause.
adjective
0
0
(obs.) To give or assign as security for a debt, etc.
verb
0
0
To bind (oneself) by a promise; pledge; specif. (now only in the passive), to bind by a promise of marriage; betroth.

He is engaged to Ann.

verb
0
0
To arrange for the services of; hire; employ.

To engage a lawyer.

verb
0
0
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To attract and hold (the attention, etc.)
verb
0
0
To employ or keep busy; occupy.

Reading engages his spare time.

verb
0
0
To enter into conflict with (the enemy)
verb
0
0
(obs.) To entangle; ensnare.
verb
0
0
To pledge oneself; promise; undertake; agree.

To engage to do something.

verb
0
0
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To occupy or involve oneself; take part; be active.

To engage in dramatics.

verb
0
0
To enter into conflict.
verb
0
0
To interlock; mesh.
verb
0
0
Committed to supporting some aim, cause, etc.
adjective
0
0
To interact socially.
verb
0
0
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To interact antagonistically.
verb
0
0
To interact contractually.
  • To arrange to employ or use (a worker, a space, etc).
  • (intransitive) To guarantee or promise (to do something).
  • To bind through legal or moral obligation (to do something, especially to marry) (usually in passive).
    They were engaged last month! They're planning to have the wedding next year.
verb
0
0
To interact mechanically.
  • To mesh or interlock (of machinery, especially a clutch).
    Whenever I engage the clutch, the car stalls out.
  • (engineering) To come into gear with.
    The teeth of one cogwheel engage those of another.
verb
0
0
(intransitive) To enter into (an activity), to participate (construed with in).
verb
0
0
To win over or attract.

His smile engages everyone he meets.

verb
0
1
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Origin of engage

  • Middle English engagen to pledge something as security for repayment of debt from Old French engagier en- in en–1 gage pledge of Germanic origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • French past participle of engager to engage from Old French engagier to pledge engage

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle French engagier, from Old French engager (“to pledge, engage”), from Old Frankish *anwadjōn (“to pledge”), from Proto-Germanic *an-, *andi- + Proto-Germanic *wadjōną (“to pledge, secure”), from Proto-Germanic *wadjō (“pledge, guarantee”), from Proto-Indo-European *wadʰ- (“to pledge, redeem a pledge; guarantee, bail”), equivalent to en- +‎ gage. Cognate with Old English anwedd (“pledge, security”), Old English weddian (“to engage, covenant, undertake”), German wetten (“to bet, wager”), Icelandic veðja (“to wager”). More at wed.

    From Wiktionary