Occupy meaning

ŏkyə-pī
To hold or fill (an office or position).
verb
4
3
To fill up (time or space).

A lecture that occupied three hours.

verb
4
4
To take up or fill up (space, time, etc.)
verb
3
1
To take or use time.
  • To fill time.
    The film occupied three hours of my time.
  • To possess or use the time or capacity of; to engage the service of.
    The film occupied me for three hours.
    I occupy myself with gardening for a few hours every day.
  • To fill or hold (an official position or role).
    I occupy the post of deputy cat catcher.
  • To hold the attention of.
    I occupied her friend while he made his proposal.
verb
1
0
To take or use space.
  • To fill space.
    The historic mansion occupied two city blocks.
  • To live or reside in.
  • (military) To have, or to have taken, possession or control of (a territory).
  • (surveying) To place the theodolite or total station at (a point).
verb
1
0
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To employ, busy, or engage (oneself, one's attention, mind, etc.)
verb
1
1
1551, Ralph Robinson (tr.), Sir Thomas More's Utopia (in Latin), 1516

Not able to occupy their old crafts.

verb
0
0
1551, Ralph Robinson (tr.), Sir Thomas More's Utopia (in Latin), 1516

They occupy not money themselves.

verb
0
0
To dwell or reside in (an apartment, for example).
verb
0
1
To seize possession of and maintain control over forcibly or by conquest.

The troops occupied the city.

verb
0
1
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To engage or employ the attention or concentration of.

Occupied the children with coloring books.

verb
0
1
To take possession of by settlement or seizure.
verb
0
1
To hold possession of by tenure.
  • To dwell in.
  • To hold (a position or office).
verb
0
1

Origin of occupy

  • Middle English occupien alteration of Old French occuper from Latin occupāre to seize ob- intensive pref. ob– capere to take kap- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English, from Old French occuper, from Latin occupare (“to take possession of, seize, occupy, take up, employ"), from ob (“to, on") + capere (“to take").

    From Wiktionary