Empty definition

ĕmptē
Lacking purpose or substance; meaningless.

An empty life.

adjective
11
3
Lacking force or power.

An empty threat.

adjective
9
5
To become empty.

The theater emptied after the performance.

verb
3
1
To discharge its contents.

The river empties into a bay.

verb
2
0
To remove the contents of.

Emptied the dishwasher.

verb
2
1
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The definition of empty is having or containing nothing, or having no worth, meaning or value.

An example of something empty is a swimming pool with no water in it.

An example of something empty is a promise that cannot be delivered upon.

adjective
1
0
An empty container.
noun
1
0
Containing nothing; having nothing in it.
adjective
1
0
Having no one in it; unoccupied; vacant.

An empty house.

adjective
1
0
Carrying or bearing nothing; bare.
adjective
1
0
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Having no worth or purpose; useless or unsatisfying.

Empty pleasure.

adjective
1
0
Without meaning or force; insincere; vain.

Empty promises.

adjective
1
0
(informal) Hungry.
adjective
1
0
To make empty.
verb
1
0
Shakespeare.

I shall find you empty of that fault.

adjective
1
0
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To transfer or pour off completely.

Empty the ashes into a pail.

verb
1
1
To unburden; relieve.

Empty oneself of doubt.

verb
1
1
Empty is defined as to remove all of something.

An example of empty is to pour all of the remaining milk into a bowl of cereal.

verb
0
0
Needing nourishment; hungry.
adjective
0
0
Devoid; destitute.

Empty of pity.

adjective
0
0
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Having nothing inside or on the surface; holding or containing nothing.

An empty bag; an empty lot.

adjective
0
0
(mathematics) Having no elements or members; null.

An empty set.

adjective
0
0
Having no occupants; not being used.

An empty chair.

adjective
0
0
Not having an incumbent or occupant; unfilled.

An empty post at the embassy.

adjective
0
0
Not put to purposeful use; idle.

Empty hours.

adjective
0
0
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To unburden or discharge (oneself or itself)
verb
0
0
To pour out or remove (the contents) from something.
verb
0
0
To transfer (the contents) into, onto, or on something else.
verb
0
0
To become empty.
verb
0
0
To pour out; discharge.

The river empties into the sea.

verb
0
0
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An empty freight car, truck, bottle, etc.
noun
0
0
Devoid of content; containing nothing or nobody; vacant.

An empty purse; an empty jug; an empty stomach.

adjective
0
0
(computing, programming) Containing no elements (as of a string or array), opposed to being null (having no valid value).
adjective
0
0
Having nothing to carry; unburdened.
adjective
0
0
Destitute of effect, sincerity, or sense; said of language.

Empty words, or threats.

adjective
0
0
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Unable to satisfy; hollow; vain.

Empty pleasures.

adjective
0
0
Destitute of reality, or real existence; unsubstantial.

Empty dreams.

adjective
0
0
Destitute of, or lacking, sense, knowledge, or courtesy.

Empty brains; an empty coxcomb.

adjective
0
0
(ergative) To make empty; to void; to remove the contents of.

To empty a well or a cistern.

The cinema emptied quickly after the end of the film.

verb
0
0
A container, especially a bottle, whose contents have been used up, leaving it empty.

Put the empties out to be recycled.

noun
0
0
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empty of
  • lacking; without; devoid of
idiom
0
0
run on empty
  • to be at a level of energy, creativity, etc. that is inadequate to sustain worthwhile activity or achievement
idiom
0
0

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
empty
Plural:
empties

Adjective

Base Form:
empty
Comparative:
emptier
Superlative:
emptiest

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

empty of

Origin of empty

  • Middle English from Old English ǣmtig vacant, unoccupied from ǣmetta leisure med- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English emty, from Old English ǣmtiġ, ǣmettiġ (“vacant, empty, free, idle, unmarried”, literally “without must or obligation, leisurely”), from Proto-Germanic *uz- (“out”) + Proto-Germanic *mōtijô, *mōtô (“must, obligation, need”), *mōtiþô (“ability, accommodation”), from Proto-Indo-European *med- (“measure; to acquire, possess, be in command”). Related to Old English ġeǣmtiġian (“to empty”), Old English ǣmetta (“leisure”), Old English mōtan (“must, might, have to”). More at mote, meet.

    From Wiktionary