Suit meaning

so͝ot
Suit means a collection or set of things.

An example of suit is diamonds, spades, hearts and clubs in playing cards.

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The definition of a suit is a complete outfit or a set of clothes meant to be worn together.

An example of suit is a tuxedo.

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An outfit worn for a special activity.

A diving suit; a running suit.

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A group of things used together; a set or collection.

A suit of sails; a suit of tools.

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Any of the four sets of 13 playing cards (clubs, diamonds, hearts, and spades) in a standard deck, the members of which bear the same marks.
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Attendance required of a vassal at his feudal lord's court or manor.
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A lawsuit.
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The act or an instance of courting a woman; courtship.

She was inclined to accept his suit.

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A set of matching outer garments, especially one consisting of a coat with trousers or a skirt, often worn on formal occasions.
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A person, especially an executive, who wears one of these garments at work.
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To meet the requirements of; fit.

This candidate does not suit our qualifications.

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To make appropriate or suitable; adapt.

Builders who suit the house to the owner's specifications.

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To be appropriate for; befit.

A color that suits you.

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To provide with clothing; dress.

The NCOs suited the recruits in green uniforms.

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To be suitable or acceptable.
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To be in accord; agree or match.
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A person wearing a suit; specif., a business executive or a bureaucrat.
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A group of similar things forming a set or series; specif., any of the four sets of thirteen playing cards each (spades, clubs, hearts, and diamonds) that together make up a pack.
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Attendance at the court or manor of a feudal lord.
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A legal action brought by one or several parties against another or others, as to recover a right, make a claim for a loss or injury, etc.
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The act of wooing; courtship.
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A set of clothes to be worn together; now, esp., a coat and trousers (or skirt), and sometimes a vest, usually all of the same material.
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Any complete outfit.

A suit of armor.

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An act of suing, pleading, or requesting.
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A petition.
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To meet the requirements of; be right for or appropriate to; befit.
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To make right or appropriate; fit; adapt.
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To please; satisfy.

Anything that suits your fancy.

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To furnish with clothes, esp. with a suit.
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To correspond or harmonize.
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To be fit, suitable, convenient, or satisfactory.
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A derogatory term for a corporate employee who wears a suit. Suits may also refer to management and marketing people. See slime.
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Any proceeding brought by one or more parties against another one or more parties in a court of law. See also action and litigation.
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See action.
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A mildly derisive term for an anonymous business executive or bureaucrat, referring to the fact that such people typically wear suits of clothes and may lack individuality. A suit, especially an empty suit, is in sharp contrast to a techie. See also empty suit and techie.
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A set of clothes to be worn together, now especially a man's matching jacket and trousers (also business suit or lounge suit), or a similar outfit for a woman.

Nick hired a navy-blue suit for the wedding.

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(by extension) A single garment that covers the whole body: space suit, boiler suit, protective suit.
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(pejorative, slang) A person who wears matching jacket and trousers, especially a boss or a supervisor.

Be sure to keep your nose to the grindstone today; the suits are making a "surprise" visit to this department.

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A full set of armour.
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(law) The attempt to gain an end by legal process; a process instituted in a court of law for the recovery of a right or claim; a lawsuit.

If you take my advice, you'll file suit against him immediately.

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Pursuit of a love-interest; wooing, courtship.

Rebate your loves, each rival suit suspend, Till this funereal web my labors end. "”Alexander Pope.

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The full set of sails required for a ship.
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(card games) Each of the sets of a pack of cards distinguished by color and/or specific emblems, such as the spades, hearts, diamonds, or clubs of traditional Anglo, Hispanic, and French playing cards.

To deal and shuffle, to divide and sort Her mingled suits and sequences. "” William Cowper.

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(archaic) A company of attendants or followers; a retinue.
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(archaic) A group of similar or related objects or items considered as a whole; a suite (of rooms etc.)
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To make proper or suitable; to adapt or fit.
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(said of clothes, hairstyle or other fashion item) To be suitable or apt for one's image.

The ripped jeans didn't suit her elegant image.

That new top suits you. Where did you buy it?

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To be appropriate or apt for.
  • Matthew Prior.
    Raise her notes to that sublime degree / Which suits song of piety and thee.
  • 1910, Emerson Hough, chapter 1, The Purchase Price.
    “[...] it is not fair of you to bring against mankind double weapons"‰! Dangerous enough you are as woman alone, without bringing to your aid those gifts of mind suited to problems which men have been accustomed to arrogate to themselves.".

The nickname "Bullet" suits her, since she is a fast runner.

Ill suits his cloth the praise of railing well.

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(most commonly used in the passive form) To dress; to clothe.
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To please; to make content; as, he is well suited with his place; to fit one's taste.

My new job suits me, as I work fewer hours and don't have to commute so much.

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(intransitive) To agree; to accord; to be fitted; to correspond; "” usually followed by to, archaically also followed by with.
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To please; satisfy.

A choice that suits us all.

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Origin of suit

From Anglo-Norman siute, from Old French sieute (modern suite), originally a participle adjective from Vulgar Latin *sequita (for secÅ«ta), from Latin sequi (“to follow"), because the component garments "follow each other", i.e. are worn together.