Cause Definition

kôz
caused, causes, causing
noun
causes
Anything producing an effect or result.
Webster's New World
A person or thing acting voluntarily or involuntarily as the agent that brings about an effect or result.
Drinking was the cause of his downfall.
Webster's New World
A reason, motive, or ground for some action, feeling, etc.; esp., sufficient reason.
Cause for complaint.
Webster's New World
A goal or principle served with dedication and zeal.
American Heritage
Any objective or movement that a person or group is interested in and supports, esp. one involving social reform.
Webster's New World
Synonyms:
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verb
caused, causes, causing
To be the cause of or reason for; result in.
American Heritage
To be the cause of; bring about; make happen; effect, induce, produce, compel, etc.
Webster's New World
Cause means to produce a result.
An example of cause is putting one foot in front of the other moves a person forward.
YourDictionary
To set off an event or action.
The lightning caused thunder.
Wiktionary
conjuntion
Because.
American Heritage
Because.
Webster's New World
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other
The last of a series of causes, although not necessarily the proximate cause, of an effect or result.
Webster's New World Law

A cause that contributes to, but is not necessary for, the production of an effect or result. See also proximate cause.

Webster's New World Law
One of multiple causes that simultaneously produce an effect or result that no single cause could.
Webster's New World Law
One of multiple causes that simultaneously produce an effect or result that any one of the causes could have produced alone.
Webster's New World Law
A contributing cause that arises or occurs after the initial action, event, or force and alters the sequence of later actions, events, or forces to produce a final effect or result. For example, if a person walks into a ditch, the digging of the ditch is the initial (that is, but-for) action, and the subsequent removal of the barricade and warning signs that kept people away is the intervening cause. Also called supervening cause.
Webster's New World Law
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idiom
make common cause with
  • to work together with toward the same objective; join forces with
Webster's New World

Other Word Forms of Cause

Noun

Singular:
cause
Plural:
causes

Idioms, Phrasal Verbs Related to Cause

  • make common cause with

Origin of Cause

  • From Middle English cause, from Old French cause (“a cause, a thing”), from Latin causa (“reason, sake, cause”), in Medieval Latin also "a thing". Origin uncertain. See accuse, excuse. Displaced native Middle English sake (“cause, reason”) (from Old English sacu (“cause”)), Middle English andweorc, andwork (“matter, cause”) (from Old English andweorc (“matter, thing, cause”)).

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English from Old French from Latin causa reason, purpose

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

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