Cause meaning

kôz
The definition of a cause is anyone or anything that brings about a result.

An example of cause is a washing machine making clothes clean.

noun
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Cause means to produce a result.

An example of cause is putting one foot in front of the other moves a person forward.

verb
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A goal or principle served with dedication and zeal.
noun
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The interests of a person or group engaged in a struggle.
noun
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A subject under debate or discussion.
noun
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One of multiple causes that simultaneously produce an effect or result that any one of the causes could have produced alone.
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Because.
conjunction
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Anything producing an effect or result.
noun
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A reason, motive, or ground for some action, feeling, etc.; esp., sufficient reason.

Cause for complaint.

noun
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A person or thing acting voluntarily or involuntarily as the agent that brings about an effect or result.

Drinking was the cause of his downfall.

noun
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Any objective or movement that a person or group is interested in and supports, esp. one involving social reform.
noun
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An action or question to be resolved by a court of law.
noun
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To be the cause of; bring about; make happen; effect, induce, produce, compel, etc.
verb
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Because.
conjunction
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An action, event, or force that produces or contributes to an effect or result. Also called causation.
noun
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The ground or reason for a choice made or action taken.
noun
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In support of a request made or an action taken. See also challenge and excuse.
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A substantial or legally sufficient reason for a choice made or action taken or for seeking a particular court order. What constitutes good cause usually rests upon the circumstances of a particular situation. See also insufficient cause.
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The last of a series of causes, although not necessarily the proximate cause, of an effect or result.
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A basis for an action or response; a reason.

The doctor's report gave no cause for alarm.

noun
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A matter to be decided by a court.
noun
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. A cause without which the events or results that follow could not occur. Also called causa sine qua non. See also but-for test, causa, and proximate cause.
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One of multiple causes that simultaneously produce an effect or result that no single cause could.
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. An insubstantial or legally insufficient reason for a choice made or action taken or for seeking a particular court order. See also good cause.
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A contributing cause that arises or occurs after the initial action, event, or force and alters the sequence of later actions, events, or forces to produce a final effect or result. For example, if a person walks into a ditch, the digging of the ditch is the initial (that is, but-for) action, and the subsequent removal of the barricade and warning signs that kept people away is the intervening cause. Also called supervening cause.
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See proximate cause.
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A cause that directly, without the contribution of any subsequent action, event, or force, produces an effect or result, and without which the effect or result would not have occurred. Furthermore, the effect or result produced by the proximate cause would have occurred even if there were a subsequent action, event, or force that contributed to the eventual effect or result. For example, if a person is fatally injured in an accident, the cause of the accident is the proximate cause of his death and not the poor medical care they received after the accident. Also called causa proxima, direct cause, efficient cause, and legal cause. See also remote cause.
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A cause that contributes to, but is not necessary for, the production of an effect or result. See also proximate cause.
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The only cause responsible for the production of an effect or result.
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A cause that arises or occurs after the initial action, event, or force, and so substantially alters the sequence of later actions, events, or forces that the persons responsible for all previous causes are not liable for the final effect or result, even if their own actions were a substantial factor in bringing about the final effect or result. For example, a parent may be negligent for letting her 14-year-old child drive a car, but the subsequent theft of the vehicle from the child would absolve the parent of liability for any damages or injuries caused by the thief’s use of the vehicle.
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The source of, or reason for, an event or action; that which produces or effects a result.

Her wedding will be cause for celebration.

They identified a burst pipe as the cause of the flooding.

noun
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A goal, aim or principle, especially one which transcends purely selfish ends.
noun
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(law) A suit or action in court; any legal process by which a party endeavors to obtain his claim, or what he regards as his right; case; ground of action.
noun
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To set off an event or action.

The lightning caused thunder.

verb
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To actively produce as a result, by means of force or authority.

His dogged determination caused the fundraising to be successful.

verb
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To assign or show cause; to give a reason; to make excuse.

verb
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To be the cause of or reason for; result in.
verb
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To bring about or compel by authority or force.

The moderator invoked a rule causing the debate to be ended.

verb
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make common cause with
  • To work together with toward the same objective; join forces with.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

make common cause with

Origin of cause

  • Middle English from Old French from Latin causa reason, purpose

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English cause, from Old French cause (“a cause, a thing”), from Latin causa (“reason, sake, cause”), in Medieval Latin also "a thing". Origin uncertain. See accuse, excuse. Displaced native Middle English sake (“cause, reason”) (from Old English sacu (“cause”)), Middle English andweorc, andwork (“matter, cause”) (from Old English andweorc (“matter, thing, cause”)).

    From Wiktionary