Object definition

ŏbjĭkt, -jĕkt
What is aimed at; purpose; end; goal.
noun
16
6
To be averse to or express disapproval of something.

Objects to modern materialism.

verb
8
2
A cause for concern.

Money is no object.

noun
7
2
(philos.) Anything that can be known or perceived by the mind.
noun
5
0
To present a dissenting or opposing argument; raise an objection.

Objected to the testimony of the witness.

verb
6
2
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(gram.) A noun or other substantive that directly or indirectly receives the action of a verb, or one that is governed by a preposition.

In “Give me the book,” “book” is the direct object and “me” is the indirect object.

noun
5
1
A thing that can be seen or touched; material thing that occupies space.
noun
4
0
To put forward in or as a reason for opposition; offer as criticism.

They objected that discipline was lacking.

verb
3
1
A person or thing to which action, thought, or feeling is directed.
noun
3
1
To feel or express disapproval or dislike.
verb
2
0
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To put forward an objection or objections; enter a protest; be opposed.
verb
2
1
A limiting factor that must be considered.

Since money is no object, let's eat at that fancy place.

noun
0
0
A noun, pronoun, or noun phrase that receives or is affected by the action of a verb within a sentence.
noun
0
0
A noun or substantive governed by a preposition and typically following it.
noun
0
0
A discrete item than can be selected and maneuvered, such as an onscreen graphic.
noun
0
0
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In object-oriented programming, a structure that combines data and the procedures necessary to operate on that data.
noun
0
0
To put forward in opposition; state by way of objection.

It was objected that the new tax law was unfair.

verb
0
0
To oppose.
verb
0
0
To thrust in; interpose.
verb
0
0
noun
0
0
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The goal, end or purpose of something.
noun
0
0
(grammar) The noun phrase which is an internal complement of a verb phrase or a prepositional phrase. In a verb phrase with a action verb, it is typically the receiver of the action.
noun
0
0
A person or thing toward which an emotion is directed.

Mary Jane had been the object of Peter's affection for years.

The convertible, once object of his desire, was now the object of his hatred.

noun
0
0
(computing) In object-oriented programming, an instantiation of a class or structure.
noun
0
0
(intransitive) To disagree with something or someone; especially in a Court of Law, to raise an objection.

I object to the proposal to build a new airport terminal.

verb
0
0
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Addison.

Others object the poverty of the nation.

verb
0
0
Whitgift.

The book [...] giveth liberty to object any crime against such as are to be ordered.

verb
0
0
Hooker.

Some strong impediment or other objecting itself.

verb
0
0
Alexander Pope.

Pallas to their eyes / The mist objected, and condensed the skies.

verb
0
0
Something perceptible by one or more of the senses, especially by vision or touch; a material thing.
noun
1
2
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The purpose, aim, or goal of a specific action or effort.

The object of the game.

noun
1
2
Object is defined as to reason or argument against something.

An example of object is to protest product testing on animals.

verb
0
1
The definition of an object is a goal or anything that is visible.

An example of object is the reason that something was done.

An example of object is an orange.

noun
0
1
(philosophy) Something intelligible or perceptible by the mind.
noun
0
1
A focus of attention, feeling, thought, or action.

A product that was so bad it became an object of derision.

noun
0
1
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To expose.
verb
0
1
To bring forward as a reason, instance, etc.; adduce.
verb
0
1

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
object
Plural:
objects

Origin of object

  • Middle English from Old French from Medieval Latin obiectum thing put before the mind from neuter past participle of Latin obicere to put before, hinder ob- before, toward ob– iacere to throw yē- in Indo-European roots V., from Middle English obiecten from Old French objecter from Latin obiectāre frequentative of obicere

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin obiectum (“object") literally "thrown against", from obiectus, perfect passive participle of obiciō (“throw against"), from ob (“against") + iaciō (“throw").

    From Wiktionary