Consent definition

kən-sĕnt
(archaic) To be of the same mind or opinion.
verb
16
8
Acceptance or approval of what is planned or done by another; acquiescence.
noun
7
3
To give assent, as to the proposal of another; agree.

Consent to medical treatment; consent to going on a business trip; consent to see someone on short notice.

verb
10
7
To acquiesce, agree, approve, assent, to voluntarily comply or yield, to give permission to some act or purpose. See also acquiescence.
verb
3
0
(voluntary agreement): dissent, disagreement, opposition, refusal.
3
0
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Agreement as to opinion or a course of action.

She was chosen by common consent to speak for the group.

noun
4
2
Consent means to agree to do something or to give permission.

An example of consent is for a parent to sign a permission slip for his child to go on a field trip.

verb
3
1
The definition of consent is the permission given for something.

An example of consent is a parent's approval of her teenage daughter spending time with her new boyfriend.

noun
2
1
Permission, approval, or assent; specif., informed consent.
noun
2
1
Agreement in opinion or sentiment.

By common consent.

noun
2
1
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See age.
1
0
Consent that is clear, definite, exact, and unmistaken.
1
0
Consent that is not specifically expressed, but that is inferred from one’s conduct.
1
0
Consent given after being completely advised of the nature, benefits, costs, and risks of a suggested course of action.
1
0
(intransitive) To express willingness, to give permission.

I've consented to have the procedure performed.

verb
1
0
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(medicine) To cause to sign a consent form.
verb
1
0
To agree in opinion or sentiment; to be of the same mind; to accord; to concur.
verb
1
0
Voluntary agreement or permission.
noun
1
0
(obs.) To agree.
verb
0
0
To agree (to do something)
verb
0
0
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To give permission, approval, or assent (to something proposed or requested) in opinion.
verb
0
0
To willingly engage in a sexual act.
verb
0
1

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
consent
Plural:
consents

Origin of consent

  • Middle English consenten from Old French consentir from Latin cōnsentīre com- com- sentīre to feel sent- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Recorded in Middle English since circa 1225, from Old French consentir, from Latin cōnsentīre, present active infinitive of cōnsentiō (“to feel together”), itself from com- (“with”) + sentiō (“to feel”)

    From Wiktionary