Refuse meaning

rĭ-fyo͝oz
To decline to accept, agree to, or do something.
verb
6
1
Refuse means trash.

An example of refuse is old furniture and papers left in a pile on the side of the road.

noun
6
2
Anything thrown away or rejected as worthless or useless; waste; trash; rubbish.
noun
4
1
adjective
3
0
Thrown away or rejected as worthless or useless.
adjective
3
1
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Collectively, items or material that have been discarded; rubbish, garbage.
noun
2
0
To decline (a request or demand).

My request for a pay rise was refused.

I refuse to listen to this nonsense any more.

verb
2
0
(intransitive) To decline a request or demand, forbear; to withhold permission.

I asked the star if I could have her autograph, but she refused.

verb
2
0
Items or material discarded or rejected as useless or worthless; trash or rubbish.
noun
2
1
To decline to accept; reject.
verb
2
1
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(military) To throw back, or cause to keep back (as the centre, a wing, or a flank), out of the regular alignment when troops are about to engage the enemy.

To refuse the right wing while the left wing attacks.

verb
1
0
(obsolete) Refusal.

noun
1
0
Refuse is defined as to reject or to decide to not do something.

An example of to refuse is to say no to attending a party.

An example of to refuse is to never give up personal beliefs.

verb
1
1
To decline to jump (an obstacle). Used of a horse.
verb
0
0
To decline to do, accept, give, or allow something.
verb
0
0
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To stop short at (a fence, etc.), without jumping it.
verb
0
0
To renounce.
verb
0
0

Origin of refuse

  • Middle English refusen from Old French refuser from Vulgar Latin refūsāre probably blend of Latin recūsāre to refuse recuse and Latin refūtāre refute refute

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old French refus rejection, refuse from refuser to refuse refuse1

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Apparently from Old French refuse (French refusé), past participle of refuser (“to refuse"), as Etymology 2, below.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Old French refuser, from Vulgar Latin *refusare, a blend of Classical Latin refutō and recusō.

    From Wiktionary