Waste meaning

wāst
Waste is defined as to destroy, wear away or use up.

An example of to waste is spending money on silly things.

verb
8
6
To use, consume, spend, or expend thoughtlessly or carelessly.
verb
5
4
Waste is matter excreted from the body, or unwanted or discarded matter.

An example of waste is sweat.

An example of waste is the wrapper from a candy bar.

noun
4
5
To pass without being put to use.

Time is wasting.

verb
3
0
The definition of waste is a wild or uninhabited place.

An example of waste is the Sahara Desert.

adjective
3
6
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To cause to lose energy, strength, or vigor; exhaust, tire, or enfeeble.

Disease wasted his body.

verb
2
1
The act or an instance of wasting or the condition of being wasted.

A waste of talent; gone to waste.

noun
2
1
To fail to take advantage of or use for profit; lose.

Waste an opportunity.

verb
1
0
A place, region, or land that is uninhabited or uncultivated; a desert or wilderness.
noun
1
0
Produced in excess of what is or can be used.

Waste energy.

adjective
1
0
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To lose energy, strength, weight, or vigor; become weak or enfeebled.

Wasting away from an illness.

verb
0
0
A devastated or destroyed region, town, or building; a ruin.
noun
0
0
Garbage; trash.
noun
0
0
The undigested residue of food eliminated from the body; excrement.
noun
0
0
Regarded or discarded as worthless or useless.

Waste trimmings.

adjective
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0
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Used as a conveyance or container for refuse.

A waste bin.

adjective
0
0
Excreted from the body.

Waste matter.

adjective
0
0
To destroy; devastate; ruin.
verb
0
0
To wear away; consume gradually; use up.
verb
0
0
To make weak, feeble, or emaciated; wear away the strength, vigor, or life of.

A man wasted by age and disease.

verb
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0
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To use up or spend without real need, gain, or purpose; squander.
verb
0
0
To fail to take proper advantage of.

To waste an opportunity.

verb
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0
(slang) To kill, usually with violence; esp., to murder.
verb
0
0
To lose strength, health, vigor, flesh, etc., as by disease; become weak or enfeebled.
verb
0
0
To be used up or worn down gradually; become smaller or fewer by gradual loss.
verb
0
0
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(now rare) To pass or be spent.
verb
0
0
To be wasted, or not put to full or proper use.
verb
0
0
Uncultivated or uninhabited; wild; barren; desolate.
adjective
0
0
Left over, superfluous, refuse, or no longer of use.

A waste product.

adjective
0
0
Excreted from the body as useless or superfluous material.
adjective
0
0
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Used to carry off or hold waste or refuse.

A waste pipe, wastebasket.

adjective
0
0
Uncultivated or uninhabited land, as a desert or wilderness.
noun
0
0
A wasting or being wasted.
  • A useless or profitless spending or consuming; squandering, as of money or time.
  • A failure to take advantage (of something)
  • A gradual loss, decrease, or destruction by use, wear, decay, deterioration, etc.
noun
0
0
Useless, superfluous, or discarded material, as ashes, garbage, or sewage.
noun
0
0
Matter excreted from the body, as feces or urine.
noun
0
0
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Cotton fiber or yarn left over from the process of milling, used for wiping machinery, packing bearings, etc.
noun
0
0
(obs.) Ruin or devastation, as by war or fire.
noun
0
0
(geol.) Material derived by land erosion or disintegration of rock, and carried to the sea by rivers and streams.
noun
0
0
To gradually lose energy, strength, or bodily substance, as from disease.
verb
0
0
The undigested residue of food eliminated from the body; excrement.
noun
0
0
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An unusable or unwanted substance or material, such as a waste product.
noun
0
0
To lose or cause to lose energy, strength, weight, or vigor, as by the progressive effects of a disease such as metastatic cancer.
verb
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0
Permanent harm done to real property by a person or persons in legal possession of that property (such as a tenant), such that the property’s value to its actual owner or future inheritor is diminished. The legal possession part is critical in distinguishing waste from trespass.
noun
0
0
An unauthorized physical change of an occupied structure by a tenant that, while technically waste, actually increases the value of the property, such as tearing out old carpeting and putting in new, better quality carpeting. Such an act is rarely considered grounds for liability.
0
0
Damage done by a lifelong tenant who normally would be unchallengeable, but who may be enjoined by the court using the standard of variance from what a prudent man would do with his own property.
0
0
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By-product of certain industries or activities, determined to be of unusually dangerous nature, e.g., radioactive waste, generally subject to special rules of disposable and/or recycling.
0
0
Damage done by a tenant’s failure to make reasonable repairs that he might normally be expected to see to, such as allowing water to accumulate in a leaky basement over the course of years.
0
0
Damage directly caused to the property by a voluntary act of the tenant, such as filling in drainage ditches or punching a hole in the roof.
0
0
noun
0
0
A place that has been laid waste or destroyed.
noun
0
0
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A large tract of uncultivated land.
noun
0
0
A vast expanse of water.
noun
0
0
A disused mine or part of one.
noun
0
0
The action or progress of wasting; extravagant consumption or ineffectual use.

That was a waste of time.

Her life seemed a waste.

noun
0
0
Large abundance of something, specifically without it being used.
noun
0
0
Gradual loss or decay.
noun
0
0
A decaying of the body by disease; wasting away.
noun
0
0
(rare) Destruction or devastation caused by war or natural disasters; See "to lay waste"
noun
0
0
noun
0
0

The cage was littered with animal waste.

noun
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0
(law) A cause of action which may be brought by the owner of a future interest in property against the current owner of that property to prevent the current owner from degrading the value or character of the property, either intentionally or through neglect.
noun
0
0
adjective
0
0
adjective
0
0
Rejected as being defective; eliminated as being worthless; produced in excess.
adjective
0
0
adjective
0
0
Dismal; gloomy; cheerless.
adjective
0
0
adjective
0
0
(now rare) To devastate or destroy.
verb
0
0
To wear away by degrees; to impair gradually; to diminish by constant loss; to use up; to consume; to spend; to wear out.
verb
0
0
To squander (money or resources) uselessly; to spend (time) idly.

E. Kay (1822-1897), afterwards Lord Justice of Appeal, had rooms on the same staircase as myself, and we wasted a great deal of time together, both in term and in my second summer vacation. 1909. Francis Galton, Memories of my life, p. 69.

We wasted millions of dollars and several years on that project.

verb
0
0
(slang) To kill; to murder.
verb
0
0
(intransitive) Gradually lose weight, weaken, become frail.
verb
0
0
(intransitive) To be diminished; to lose bulk, substance, strength, value etc. gradually.
verb
0
0
(law) To damage, impair, or injure (an estate, etc.) voluntarily, or by allowing the buildings, fences, etc., to fall into decay.
verb
0
0
waste (one's) breath
  • To gain or accomplish nothing by speaking.
idiom
0
0
go to waste
  • to be or become wasted
idiom
0
0
lay waste (to)
  • to destroy; devastate; make desolate
idiom
0
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

waste (one's) breath
lay waste (to)

Origin of waste

  • Middle English wasten from Old North French waster from Latin vāstāre to make empty from vāstus empty euə- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English wasten (“to waste, lay waste"), from Anglo-Norman, Old Northern French waster (“to waste, devastate") (cf. also the variant gaster and French gâter from a related Old French word); the Anglo-Norman form waster was either from Old Frankish *wuastan, *wuostan, *wuostjan (“to lay waste, devastate"), from Proto-Germanic *wōstijanÄ… (“to waste"), from Proto-Indo-European *wāsto- (“empty, wasted"), or alternatively from Latin vastāre, present active infinitive of vastō and influenced by the Frankish; the English word was assisted by similarity to native Middle English westen ("to waste"; > English weest). Cognate with Old High German wuostan, wuastan, wuostjan ("to waste"; > Modern German wüsten), Old English wÄ“stan (“to lay waste, ravage").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English waste (noun, “a waste"), from Anglo-Norman, Old Northern French wast, waste (“a waste"), from Old Frankish *wuasti, *wuosti (“a waste") and *wōstin, *wōstinna (“a waste, wasteland, desert"), from Proto-Germanic *wōstÄ« (“a waste"), *wōstinjō (“a waste, wasteland"), from Proto-Indo-European *wāsto- (“empty, wasted"). Cognate with Old High German wuosti, wuasti ("a waste"; > Modern German Wüste), Old High German wuostinna (“a desert, waste"), Old English wÄ“sten (“a waste, wasteland"). Non Germanic cognates include Latin vastus (“waste, desert") and Albanian vjeshtë (“autumn").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English waste (adjective, “waste"), from Anglo-Norman, Old Northern French wast (“waste"), from Old Frankish *wuasti, *wuosti (“waste, empty"), from Proto-Germanic *wōstijaz (“wasted, abandoned, empty"), from Proto-Indo-European *wāsto- (“empty, wasted"). Cognate with Old High German wuosti, wuasti (“waste, empty"), Old Saxon wōsti (“desolate"), Old English wÄ“ste (“waste, barren, desolate, empty").

    From Wiktionary