Destroy meaning

dĭ-stroi
To be destructive; cause destruction.
verb
17
2
To tear down; demolish.
verb
16
1
To bring to total defeat; crush.
verb
13
1
To put an end to; do away with.
verb
13
2
To break up or spoil completely; ruin.
verb
10
3
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To kill.
verb
1
0
To make useless.
verb
1
0
To bring about destruction.
verb
1
0
To neutralize the effect of.
verb
0
0
To damage beyond use or repair.

The earthquake destroyed several apartment complexes.

verb
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0
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(intransitive) To cause destruction.

Hooligans destroy unprovoked.

verb
0
0

Smoking destroys the natural subtlety of the palate.

verb
0
0
To put down or euthanize.

Destroying a rabid dog is required by law.

verb
0
0
(colloquial) To defeat soundly.
verb
0
0
(computing) To remove data.

The memory leak happened because we forgot to destroy the temporary lists.

verb
0
0
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To destroy is defined as to damage, ruin or spoil something beyond repair.

When you drive a truck into a house and totally demolish it, this is an example of a situation where you destroy the house.

verb
0
1
To break apart the structure of, render physically unusable, or cause to cease to exist as a distinguishable physical entity.

The fire destroyed the library. The tumor was destroyed with a laser.

verb
0
1
To put an end to; eliminate.
verb
0
1
To render useless or ruin.

Felt that an overemphasis on theory had destroyed the study of literature.

verb
0
1
To put to death; kill.

Destroy a rabid dog.

verb
0
1
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To subdue or defeat completely; crush.

The rebel forces were destroyed in battle.

verb
0
1
To cause emotional trauma to; devastate.

The divorce destroyed him.

verb
0
1

Origin of destroy

  • Middle English destroien from Old French destruire from Vulgar Latin dēstrūgere back-formation from Latin dēstrūctus past participle of dēstruere to destroy dē- de- struere to pile up ster-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English destroyen, from Old French destruire, Vulgar Latin *destrugō, from Classical Latin dēstruō, from dē- (“un-, de-”) + struō (“I build”). Displaced native Old English shend (“destroy, injure”).

    From Wiktionary