Retract meaning

rĭ-trăkt
To draw back or in.

A plane retracting its landing gear.

verb
4
0
To draw back.

A leash that retracts into a plastic case.

verb
4
0
To draw back or in.

To retract claws.

verb
4
0
To pull back inside.

An airplane retracts its wheels for flight.

verb
4
0
To withdraw or disavow (a statement, promise, offer, charge, etc.); recant.
verb
3
2
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(intransitive) To draw back; to draw up.

Muscles retract after amputation.

A cat can retract its claws.

verb
2
0
To take back or withdraw something one has said.

I retract all the accusations I made about the senator and sincerely hope he won't sue me.

verb
1
0
To take something back or disavow it.
verb
0
0
To take back, as a grant or favour previously bestowed; to revoke.

verb
0
0
To retract is to withdraw something you said or did.

When you made a statement and then realized you spoke in error and take back what you said, this is an example of a situation where you retract your statement.

When you pull your hand back because it touches a hot flame, this is an example of a situation where you retract your hand.

verb
0
1
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To take back; disavow.

Refused to retract the statement.

verb
0
1

Origin of retract

  • Latin retractāre to revoke frequentative of retrahere to draw back re- re- trahere to draw V., tr., senses 2 and 3, and v., intr., sense 2, Middle English retracten from Old French retracter from Latin retractus past participle of retrahere

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin retractum, past participle of retrahere.

    From Wiktionary