Dispatch meaning

dĭ-spăch
The act of sending off, as to a specific destination.
noun
5
2
The act of putting to death.
noun
2
1
To put an end to; kill.
verb
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0
To finish quickly or promptly.
verb
1
0
To eat up quickly.
verb
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0
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To send a shipment with promptness.
verb
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To send an important official message sent by a diplomat or military officer with promptness.
verb
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To send a journalist to a place in order to report.
verb
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To hurry.
verb
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To dispose of speedily, as business; to execute quickly; to make a speedy end of; to finish; to perform.
verb
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To rid; to free.
verb
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To destroy quickly and efficiently.
verb
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(computing) To pass on for further processing, especially via a dispatch table (often with to).
verb
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Double dispatch.
hyponyms
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Multiple dispatch.
hyponyms
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Single dispatch.
hyponyms
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A message sent quickly, as a shipment, a prompt settlement of a business, or an important official message sent by a diplomat, or military officer.
noun
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The act of doing something quickly.

When you act with dispatch, you act speedily and efficiently.

noun
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A mission by an emergency response service, typically attend to an emergency in the field.
noun
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The definition of dispatch is to send off quickly.

An example of dispatch is to send firefighters to an emergency scene.

verb
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1
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Dispatch is defined as the quick send off of something or someone.

An example of dispatch is an ambulance which is sent to a car crash site.

noun
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1
To relegate to a specific destination or send on specific business.
verb
0
1
To put to death summarily.
verb
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1
Dismissal or rejection of something regarded as unimportant or unworthy of consideration.
noun
0
1
Speed in performance or movement.
noun
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1
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To send off or out promptly, usually on a specific errand or official business.
verb
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1
A dispatching; sending out or off.
noun
0
1
An act of killing.
noun
0
1
Efficient speed; promptness.
noun
0
1
A message, esp. an official message.
noun
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1
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A news story sent to a newspaper or broadcaster, as by a correspondent.
noun
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1

Origin of dispatch

  • Spanish despachar or Italian dispacciare both probably ultimately from Old Provençal empachar to impede from Vulgar Latin impāctāre frequentative of Latin impingere to dash against impinge

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • The etymology of the word is uncertain. It is connected to the French dépêcher and dépêche which are in meaning equivalents to this word. The French words are made up of the prefix dés- (Lat. dis-) and the root of empêcher (Lat. impedicare, composed from prefix in- and pedica) translated as 'to refrain', 'to stop'. The French word came into English as "depeach", which was in use from the 15th century until "despatch" was introduced. This word is direct from the Italian dispacciare, or Spanish despachar, which must be derived from the Lat. root appearing in pactus (the perfect passive infinitive of the verb pangere) meaning fixed, fastened. The New English Dictionary finds the earliest instance of dispatch letter to Henry VIII. from Bishop Tunstall, commissioner to Spain in 1516–1517.

    From Wiktionary