Haste meaning

hāst
The definition of haste is speed or urgency.

An example of haste is how quickly a package is delivered; delivered with haste.

An example of haste is the hurrying of a catering staff to get food served; working with haste.

noun
8
3
Rash or headlong action; precipitateness.

Forgot the tickets in their haste to catch the train.

noun
3
2
Rapidity of action or motion.

The haste with which she climbed the stairs.

noun
3
3
verb
2
1
Necessity for hurrying; urgency.

An air of haste marks the undertaking.

noun
1
1
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Speed; swiftness; dispatch.

We were running late so we finished our meal in haste.

noun
0
1
To urge onward; to hasten.
verb
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1
To hasten or cause to hasten.
verb
0
2
The act of hurrying; quickness of motion; rapidity.
noun
0
2
The act of hurrying carelessly or recklessly.

Haste makes waste.

noun
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2
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(intransitive) To move with haste.
verb
0
2
make haste
  • To move or act swiftly; hurry.
idiom
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0
in haste
  • in a hurry
  • in too great a hurry; without enough care
idiom
0
0
make haste
  • to hasten; hurry
idiom
0
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of haste

  • Middle English from Old French of Germanic origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Blend of Middle English hasten (verb), (compare Dutch haasten, German hasten, Danish haste, Swedish hasta (“to hasten, rush”)) and Middle English hast (“haste”, noun), from Old French haste (French: hâte), from Old Frankish *haist, *haifst (“violence”) , from Proto-Germanic *haifstiz (“struggle, conflict”), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱēybʰ- (“fast, snell, fierce”). Akin to Old Frisian hāst, hāste (“haste”), Old English hǣst (“violence”), Old English hǣste (“violent, impetuous, vehement”, adj), Old Norse heift/heipt (“feud”), Gothic (haifsts, “rivalry”). Cognate with German and Danish heftig (“vehement”).

    From Wiktionary