Hurry definitions

hûr'ē, hŭr'-
Activity or motion that is often unduly hurried; haste.

I forgot my gloves in my hurry to catch the bus.

noun
64
2
The need or wish to hurry; a condition of urgency.

In no hurry to leave.

noun
61
1
A hurrying or being hurried; rush; urgency.
noun
58
1
To move or act with speed or haste.
verb
58
3
To cause to move or act with speed or haste.

Hurried the children to school.

verb
55
0
Eagerness to do, act, go, etc. quickly.
noun
55
1
To cause to move or act with undue haste; rush.

Was hurried into marriage.

verb
51
1
To move or act with haste; move faster than is comfortable or natural.
verb
51
1
To speed the progress or completion of; expedite.

Hurried the delivery of the product.

verb
48
0
To cause to move or act more rapidly or too rapidly; drive, move, send, force, or carry with haste.
verb
48
1
To cause to occur or be done more rapidly or too rapidly; accelerate the preparation or completion of; urge on.
verb
45
1
To urge or cause to act soon or too soon.
verb
42
1
The definition of hurry is a feeling of urgency.

An example of a hurry is a person's state of mind as they try to get to work on time; in a hurry to go to work.

noun
15
0
To hurry is defined as to rush, move quickly or do something faster than is comfortable.

An example of hurry is to run to catch the bus.

An example of hurry is to try to finish your homework quickly, making lots of mistakes.

verb
12
0
Rushed action.

Why are you in such a big hurry?

noun
5
0
(sports) In American football, an incidence of a defensive player forcing the quarterback to act faster than the quarterback was prepared to, resulting in a failed offensive play.
noun
5
0

There is no hurry on that paperwork.

noun
2
0
(intransitive) To do things quickly.

He's hurrying because he's late.

verb
2
0
(intransitive) Often with up, to speed up the rate of doing something.

If you don't hurry you won't finish on time.

verb
0
0
To cause to be done quickly.
verb
0
0
To hasten; to impel to greater speed; to urge on.
verb
0
0
To impel to precipitate or thoughtless action; to urge to confused or irregular activity.
verb
0
0

Origin of hurry

Middle English horyed (“rushed, impelled”), frequentative of hurren (“to vibrate rapidly, buzz”), from Proto-Germanic *hurzaną (“to rush”) (compare Middle High German hurren (“to hasten”), Norwegian hurre (“to whirl around”)), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱers-, *ḱors- (“to run, hurry”) (compare Welsh carrog (“torrent”), Latin currō (“I run”), Tocharian A/B kursär/kwärsar (“league; course”), Lithuanian karsiù (“to go quickly”)). Related to horse, rush.