Flurry definition

flûrē, flŭrē
A sudden, brief rush of wind; gust.
noun
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Flurry is defined as to be moved in a quick way.

When you hurry around your kitchen in a state of over-excitement trying to get Thanksgiving dinner ready, this is an example of a time when you flurry.

When snowflakes are picked up by gusts of wind and create a swirling mass, this is an example of a time when they flurry.

verb
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A short period of active trading, as on a stock exchange.
noun
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A sudden gust of wind.
noun
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A stirring mass, as of leaves or dust; a shower.
noun
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noun
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A sudden and brief blast or gust; a light, temporary breeze.

A flurry of wind.

noun
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A shower of dust, leaves etc. brought on by a sudden gust of wind.
noun
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Any sudden activity; a stir.

The day before the wedding was a flurry of preparations.

noun
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A snack consisting of soft ice cream with small pieces of fruit, cookie, etc.
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The violent spasms of a dying whale.
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verb
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(intransitive) To move or fall in a flurry.
verb
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To agitate, stir, or confuse.
verb
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To move or come down in a flurry.
verb
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The definition of a flurry is also a swirling mast of something such as snow or leaves that may be moved by wind, or a commotion of many things happening all at once.

An example of a flurry is when snowflakes are carried along in the wind and are swirling about in the air; a snow flurry.

An example of a flurry is when 20 people arrive all at once to a party; a flurry of activity.

noun
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A gust of rain or snow.
noun
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A brief fluctuation in stock market prices or increase in trading.
noun
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To confuse; agitate.
verb
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To move in a quick, flustered way.
verb
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A brief, light snowfall.
noun
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A sudden burst or commotion; a stir.

A flurry of interest in the new product; a flurry of activity when the plane landed.

noun
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A sudden confusion or commotion.
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
flurry
Plural:
flurries

Origin of flurry

  • Perhaps from flurr to scatter

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Perhaps an American English blend of flutter and hurry. Alternatively, perhaps from an obsolete term flurr (“scatter”).

    From Wiktionary